unspeculative

unspeculative

(ʌnˈspɛkjʊlətɪv)
adj
not characterized by speculation
References in classic literature ?
She obeyed the signal to wait for him with unspeculative repose, and in a few minutes man and horse stopped beside her.
Under such circumstances, there are many among its myriads of souls who have absolutely needed an emphatic belief, life in this unpleasurable shape demanding some solution even to unspeculative minds,--just as you inquire into the stuffing of your couch when anything galls you there, whereas eider-down and perfect French springs excite no question.
(10) "You will sell them immediately," she informs the astonished Henry in imperious tones," and reinvest the money in something quite unspeculative and unsound, like War Loan, that will pay a proper dividend" (98).
One effect, incidentally, of the precedence and prevalence of this unspeculative spirit in what some appropriated as African philosophy is probably responsible for a certain narrative proclivity easily perceptible in some writings in African philosophy.
Thus Herbert Spencer's [1882, 1.344] Principles of Sociology observed that the primitive mind is "unspeculative, uncritical, incapable of generalizing, and with scarcely any notions save those yielded by perceptions." In a subsequent edition, Spencer [1896, 1.87] noted that the primitive mind "gives credence to an impossible fiction as readily as to a familiar fact." Both Spencer and his contemporary, the anthropologist Edward B.
James Thomson 1700-1748: A Life is a masterpiece of unspeculative, unsensationalized research.
Not only is this flight old in such an unspeculative book, but Mepham will not aknowledge that any conclusions as to when Woolf first read Freud are conjectual.