unspiritual

unspiritual

(ʌnˈspɪrɪtjʊəl)
adj
not spiritual
References in classic literature ?
All of them, however unspiritual on other days, were transfigured by the Sabbath influence; so that their very garments--whether it were an old man's decent coat well brushed for the thousandth time, or a little boy's first sack and trousers finished yesterday by his mother's needle--had somewhat of the quality of ascension-robes.
"But that would be pauperizing them," said an earnest girl, who liked the Schlegels, but thought them a little unspiritual at times.
Avoid talking about heavy or unspiritual subjects before service.
Most of the reforms and reformation took place in a religion when an individual or a group of individuals took initiative to challenge the unspiritual elements.
There's nothing unspiritual about they demanding to know how the hard-earned money they give to the church is spent.
There are no words that have not been soiled by unspiritual use, and when we speak of things spiritual we have to use the vocabulary that not so long ago might have languished in a gutter.
Spirituality can help us embody our soul if it values our humanity as much as our divinity; encourages us to reintegrate the rejected (sometimes "unspiritual") parts of ourselves; honors our soul's sovereignty; supports our soul's unique path, expression, and truth; roots us in our bodies and onto this planet; and helps us be genuinely, wildly alive.
Around the corner on the top floor of Chrestman Hall, from where Louis recently had kicked out my unspiritual teeth, lived Charlie Long from Ethel, Mississippi.
Interestingly, Femi Adesina Special, Special Adviser on Media and Publicity to President Muhammadu Buhari, rejoins Abati's piece in his treatise entitled 'The Unspiritual Side of Aso Villa', dispelling the aura of mysticism about Aso Villa and the superhuman figure cut for the residents.
Yes, it has a Guildhall and Nott Square and the Celtic mystery of Merlin, now inappropriately sited in the modern, unspiritual alleyway entered via a Sky TV caravan.
Geist and Zeitgeist: The Spirit in an Unspiritual Age.
In his Institutes, John Cassian describes acedia as something akin to sadness, "a particularly dangerous and frequent foe of those dwelling in the desert." (29) Once it seizes hold of someone, "it makes a person horrified at where he is, disgusted with his cell, and also disdainful and contemptuous of the brothers who live with him or at a slight distance, as being careless and unspiritual. Likewise it renders him slothful and immobile in the face of all the work to be done within the walls of his dwelling." (30)