unstartling

unstartling

(ʌnˈstɑːtlɪŋ)
adj
not startling
References in periodicals archive ?
Somehow an unstartling feature of the Government's education reforms has been used to whip naturally-protective parents into panic, stirring up fears that their precious, carefree youngsters are being subjected to exam conditions when they should be making Halloween masks out of paper plates.
The unstartling insight is that once we're "comfortable," further income is often largely dedicated to competing with the material possessions of other well-off people.
In fact, we journey through some unstartling terrain, such as the account of the development of absolute music in the section "From Mimesis to Transcendence" (pp.
And in prison, Tanya's social whirl continues with visits from Jack and Max (not together) and an unstartling revelation about the hit and run.
I offer these unstartling examples of journalism because nowadays the art of fair comment reporting seems only to be seen in rare instances.
I wonder how much of the taxpayers' money went into this unstartling discovery.
Justice (then Judge) Ruth Bader Ginsburg pointed to "the general, unstartling statement made in a leading treatise: 'The Uniform Commercial Code is not uniform.'" Id.
Typical is the unstartling, but often overlooked observation, that the mainstream study of work largely ignores unpaid labour, a huge area, which if paid for, would overwhelm the total value of paid work.
Not surprisingly, these places occur along the chronological route: well-mapped places with a strong linear history, around which Cunliffe has spun a convincing if unstartling yarn.
The other offerings from those in the know are also fairly unstartling. For example, some of them were at the Doncaster Sales last week.
As might be expected, Green devotes special attention to the geography of economic change, focusing on certain key trades, though his conclusions prove unstartling. Skilled labor tended to concentrate on the West End, while unskilled labor thrived in the East End.
Not that this book is all bad: there is an essay on Kingsley and Christian manliness, useful if unstartling. It concludes that his 'socialism' was paternalistic (like most 'radical' socially conscious Victorian writers, he wanted change to be slowed down and class conflict dissolved in sentiment).