unsubject

unsubject

(ʌnˈsʌbdʒɪkt)
adj
not subject (usually to); not subjected
vb (tr)
literary to remove from subjugation; to free from a subject state
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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To him, it is the right of a man to be a man, and not a brute; the right to call the wife of his bosom is wife, and to protect her from lawless violence; the right to protect and educate his child; the right to have a home of his own, a religion of his own, a character of his own, unsubject to the will of another.
Bare life is, then, an unsubject outside both the law of human civilization and divine law, a being totally unprotected and unvalued.
The most spontaneous thing in the video may have been the papers in the tableau of Chatterton, which Shonibare animated to skitter across the floor, like mice, unsubject to rule.
Becket is an uncompromising Catholic in a pre-Reformation and Roman sense: "Whatever the Church owns--she holds it in / Free and perpetual altos, unsubject to / One earthly sceptre," though acknowledging Rome's political corruption.
You need to know that the person who is taking your dream and your bank account into their hands is not only twice as much in love with your property as you are, but is also as technically gifted as a brain-surgeon, entirely unsubject to lapses of concentration and, in terms of character, as spotless as the Holy Ghost.
As all along where the pine tree falls, its dissolution leaves a mossy mound--last-flung shadow of the perished trunk; never lengthening, never lessening; unsubject to the fleet falsities of the sun; shade immutable and true gauge which cometh by prostration--so westward from what seems the stump, one steadfast spear of lichened ruin veins the plain.
Surely death is not death, and humanity is not extinct; but merely passed into other shapes, unsubjected to our perceptions.
The very existence of the Jews as an autonomous, unsubjected people undermined the creedal system that empowered ecclesiastical Christianity--the divinity of Christ, the transubstantiation of the Eucharist, clerical monopoly on text and interpretation of the Bible (especially the subversive passages of the Hebrew Bible).