unsubjected

unsubjected

(ˌʌnsəbˈdʒɛktɪd)
adj
not subjected
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References in periodicals archive ?
Surely death is not death, and humanity is not extinct; but merely passed into other shapes, unsubjected to our perceptions.
The very existence of the Jews as an autonomous, unsubjected people undermined the creedal system that empowered ecclesiastical Christianity--the divinity of Christ, the transubstantiation of the Eucharist, clerical monopoly on text and interpretation of the Bible (especially the subversive passages of the Hebrew Bible).
However, although early Stoic sources show that they also focused on both aspects (21), Epictetus' discussion of the notion of assent is based primarily on the second perspective, and the decisive issue shifts from the impressions assented to (22) to how they are taken in, i.e., whether they are taken in after careful analysis, which is precisely what the wise person does: Just as Socrates used to tell us not to live a life unsubjected to examination, so we ought not to accept an impression unsubjected to examination, but should say, 'Wait, allow me to see who you are and whence you come' (just as the night-watch say, 'Show me your tokens').
From early on, "Time Passes" renders existence in its anonymous and unsubjected state, existence as there-is, as interrogation:
(E 91) Of these 'resources'--which, we might note in passing, are fundamentally both subjective (that is anobjective) and asubject-ive (that is human)--the first, discernability, presents the most immediate problem: insofar as the event is radically unknowable there remains the dilemma of precisely how to discern when we are truly 'immortalized' in its wake, which is to say, how do we know when we are subject to good (truth) or subject to evil (the simulacrum of truth), or, conversely, to neither (and hence 'unsubjected')?