unswayable

Related to unswayable: unassailable

unswayable

(ʌnˈsweɪəbəl)
adj
not able to be swayed or influenced
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Consequently, since nothing is exempt from ultimately relying on God, or Nature to continue to be, or be conceivable, either essentially or ontologically, we may assert that no unconditioned, uncompelled, or unswayable being or entity, bares existence or reality in Spinoza's sketch of life, aside from God, or Nature.
But the nastier his messages, the more he is adored by his unswayable cultist following.
Christian discipleship is, on this account, "radical" in at least three ways: it goes back to its "root" (radix)--Jesus Christ as portrayed in the New Testament; it is a form of "extreme" and unswayable commitment, of steadfast faith; and it repudiates significant areas of the socio-political status quo as vicious scenes of bondage and violence.
It is quintessential parental love, an unquenchable and unswayable desire that transcends culture, race, and creed.
A tree has to be pretty stiff and unswayable before it's more efficient to jump from it to the next tree.
In one description of regional traits, first published in the December 1867 issue of Galaxy Magazine and later reprinted in Democratic Vistas (1871), Whitman asserted that the country gets "from the north, intellect, the sun of things, also the idea of unswayable justice, anchor amid the last, the wildest tempests," and "from the south the living soul, the animus of good and bad, haughtily admitting no demonstration but its own" (PP, 976).
Necessity then, is unbendable, "opposed to motion," immovable, and unswayable. Accordingly, anagke is the very antithesis of possibility and persuasion.
The president suavely ignored the former, likely reasoning that they are unswayable. To the latter, he addressed his closing comment.
Interestingly though, when it comes to discussing the emergence of Jaspers 'unviolable, untemptable, unswayable' personality (KJ, p76), Arendt differs from the Stoic-inspired Kantian interpretation of character as emanating from a form of masculine will and pride, commensurate with the desire to display virtuosity and heroism in the public sphere while repudiating dissimulating female oriented traits such as gallantry.
No less unswayable in the pursuit of her aims than Lady Audley, she never violates the bounds of decorum--not to mention the law.
After the interval, the courts scene is dominated by Bob Graham, as the judge who is unswayable from what he sees as his mission to uphold the law.
Perkins's reply was conciliatory but unswayable as he lectured his now bestselling author, the market for a $2.50 book had been exhausted, and it was up to reprint houses to serve the $1.00 masses.