untenantable

untenantable

(ʌnˈtɛnəntəbəl)
adj
(Law) (of a dwelling) unfit to be tenanted; uninhabitable
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I abated everyone's rents from the period we determined that the buildings were untenantable until they were back online.
* A part or all of the described premises is rendered untenantable if coverage for Business Income including "Rental Value" or "Rental Value" applies.
And if the building is left by the previous tenant in an untenantable condition, a landlord must pursue the outgoing entity to minimise his business loss as a result.
(b) That a part or all of the described premises is rendered untenantable, if coverage for Business Income applies.
Creative Walking suffered direct physical damage due to a water main break, leaving its premises untenantable. It moved to a temporary facility a few weeks later and made the temporary facility its new headquarters.
That a part or all (emphasis added) of the described premises is rendered untenantable, if coverage for Business Income including "Rental Value" or "Rental Value" applies.
It assures continuous income while the building is untenantable.
Either a partial or complete shutdown may be considered a suspension; but part or all of the described premises (for example, the insured office building) must be untenantable because of direct physical loss caused by a covered cause of loss.
a) If the lease agreement requires continuation of rent; and if the property is wholly untenantable or unusable, the actual rent payable for the unexpired term of the lease; or if the property is partially untenantable or unusable, the proportion of the rent payable for the unexpired term of the lease.
It was also an attempt to discourage eviction by making the evicted land untenantable, further driving down rents and weakening the position of landlords.
In that case, as a result of severe water damage to the premises which made the premises untenantable, a tenant was entitled to an abatement and the landlord was required to repair the water leaks at its expense.
Again, according to California law, "[a] dwelling shall be deemed untenantable for purposes of Section 1941 if it substantially lacks ...