untender


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untender

(ʌnˈtɛndə)
adj
1. not tender or soft; not delicate; tough
2. not tender or gentle; rough; unkind
3. not tender in years; mature
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
She sniffed and was raising an untender hand, when I checked her.
Martha Grace Duncan, "So Young and So Untender": Remorseless Children and the Expectations of the Law, 102 COLUM.
[4] rice with high amylose content is hard, dry and untender, while the rice with low amylose usually produced not dry cooked rice, tender texture, not tough when it is cold, the taste is delicious and the cooked rice is shiny.
oh the unyielding, untender and unattractive texture.
In "Shame," the brothers sing of regret in the wake of an argument and its resulting loss of love: "I know the things I said to you/they were untender and untrue/I'd like to see those things undo/So if you could find it in your heart/to give a man a second start/I promise things won't end the same." "When I Drink" humorously follows the same thematic thread: "When I drink I say things I don't wanna say/I do things I don't wanna do/I talk mean to you/I have fistfights with the air (and I lose)."
(255) Martha Grace Duncan, "So Young and So Untender":
"Untender is the Night in The Garden of Eden: Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and the Mediterranean." Anglo-American Modernity and the Mediterranean.
Instead she and her sister Gloria were left to the untender mercies of her mother, who had set up home in Portsmouth with her husband's former best friend.
From c1820, aboriginal peoples were left to the untender righteousness of civil authorities promoting white settlement, agriculture, woodcutting and, soon, steel rails instead of supple canoes.
To judge from the response at Cannes, audiences were far more disturbed by a scene of stolid, not untender, conjugal relations between Marcos and his thick-necked, rotund senora.
We walked through a plastic picket fence into the churchyard, where the grass had taken on the untender dark green of late summer.