untillable

untillable

(ʌnˈtɪləbəl)
adj
(Agriculture) (of land) that cannot be tilled
References in periodicals archive ?
When Filipinos look at the Philippine topographic map, they bewail the fact that we are a mountainous country with more than two-fifths of the land having steep, untillable slopes.
Rice fields cost about $4,000 an acre and even untillable swampland is going for $2,000 an acre.
The court reasoned that after the installation of the tiling, the manner of flow changed from what was a natural, forceful flow and now is a steady but slow flow which rendered the lands untillable and even produced weed growth, Id.
I had looked out on flooded fields week after week, seeing the water turn to ice, seeing it linger in ruts and gullies, leaving the fields untillable.
They purchased land which was mostly semi-arid, although much had been rendered untillable by deforestation, soil erosion, and neglect.
Kopytoff & David Streitfeld, Big Shoes at Apple, but Maybe Not Untillable, N.
One survivor recalled being "simply dumped upon this inhospitable and untillable land, with cannibalistic savages in the surrounding woods.
The refugee ex-slaves found themselves segregated in impoverished villages, given scraps of untillable land, deprived of the rights normally extended to British subjects, forced to work on road construction in return for promised provisions, and gradually reduced to peonage.
Farmers planted eucalypts as windbreaks and up untillable canyons, hoping to prevent erosion losses.
Much of the Cape is untillable on a large-scale basis because the topsoil has been blown away and replaced by increasing drifts of sand.
Land use designations on the MRPJ cards divided acreage into three major categories: Class "A" Agricultural, which included cropland, farmstead, and untillable pasture; Class "D", which indicated orchards; Class "E", which designated nonagricultural uses like roads and wooded areas.
For example, Class A agricultural land included cropland and farmstead, wild hay, untillable pasture; Class B included special agriculture; Class C was swampland; Class D was commercial orchard, vineyards, or berries; Class E was nonagricultural (e.