untinged

untinged

(ʌnˈtɪndʒd)
adj
not tinged or coloured; unaffected; unstained
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Her deep musings, melancholy though they were, were not untinged with a certain vague joy.
Even those whose feelings toward homeless people are untinged by empathy, however, ought to be able to grasp the idea that their city and their country are far better off when people get off the streets or out of shelters and into housing, or avoid becoming homeless in the first place.
That's where the ultimate sincerity of Blair's pictures and installations lies: in demonstrating that seeing is never untinged by illusion.
patriotism which was indeed quite untinged by vulgarity but was so
Yet he easily regained that enviable good cheer untinged by cynicism.
I'm not guilty of softening hard memories with happy stories when I say I think of it as a time of real challenge and excitement, if one not untinged with some of the petty conformism one has to expect in that sort of environment.
It is unclear how hard-headed and untinged by idealism a reasonable observer is expected to be.
Louis childhood, Barra notes that, though the future Yankee's family was far from affluent, his childhood experience was "an idyllic existence for a boy, its pleasures untinged by the misery caused by the Depression in the outside world" (n).
Like Sappho's, her eroticism is a source of inspiration untinged by Judeo-Christian guilt (de Noailles was an atheist) and thus outside the reductive tendencies of the virgin/whore polarities inherent in the Western cult of the Beloved.
Jane Strachey rejected any suggestion that she was intimately involved with Marie Souvestre--and succeeded in re-establishing the friendship as one in which there was affection untinged by any erotic sentiment.
a hundred campaigns have tanned his heart to leather, and from the cracking of that heart there issues a terrible music, not untinged by madness.
(Her husband Philip IV was also her uncle in the blood-line, which is an example of the inbreeding which destroyed the Spanish Habsburgs.) Sometimes he overcompensated for his lack of expressive finesse by exaggerating a discrete outburst of feeling, as in Jacob and the Blood-stained Coat of Joseph (The Escorial) in which Jacob receives the report of his son's death with hyperbolical astonishment untinged with grief or even regret.