untransmuted

untransmuted

(ˌʌntrænzˈmjuːtɪd)
adj
not transmuted; that has not been transmuted or transformed
References in periodicals archive ?
Even where Dial does use objects to represent themselves--the ceramic vases of Art and Nature, 2011, for instance--they are deployed pictorially (and also perhaps allegorically, as the title of that work suggests), rather than as stray examples of quotidian, artistically untransmuted matter employed as such.
When we say that Woolf judges Austen to be the solitary example of a woman writer whose mind has "consumed all impediments," including her anger at having to pursue her literary vocation surreptitiously, subject to numerous interruptions in the parlor, we need to add to the word "solitary" the qualifying phrase, "except for Woolf herself." The proof copy is rife with examples of Woolf attempting to erase from the text any evidence of her untransmuted anger, or of what might be called an aggrieved sensibility.
In an unforgettable indictment, Lewis dismissed the last two books, outlining 'sacred history from the Fall to the Last Day', as 'an untransmuted lump of futurity'.
Describing a key development in her life as artist, Boland says: 'You're not sure what's the proper self and what's simply untransmuted egotism.
represent a grief untransmuted from its actual sources in her experience' (Curran, 1994: 72-3).
I will suggest that punctuation remains something of an "untransmuted lump" for both queasy modernizers and antimodernizing historicists.(8) In this paper, I hope to begin the process of transmutation, proceeding in the spirit of Random Cloud's manifesto for textual studies: "simply to establish critical rapport between our on-going speculations and documentary evidence."(9) I shall, however, conclude with one modest practical proposal, and one observation about the specific limits to editorial modernization of the punctuation in Shakespearean texts.(10)
When the same root, on the other hand, redundantly reentered Hebrew via English in the present century to signify the common household sponge - the sea animal continues to be called s'fog - it did so rudely untransmuted as sponja, a phonetic barbarism (the soft j-sound is not even represented in the traditional Hebrew alphabet), so unmanipulable that one has to do violence to the idiomatic integrity of the language simply to use it in a sentence.
Updike has a good ear for the idioms and rhythms of intellectual argument, but too often in this novel he uses dialogue to drag in untransmuted lumps of historical context and canned opinion.
The |Ru.sup.100~, for example, would be separated from untransmuted Tc by bubbling ozone through a mixture of the two substances--a method developed at Los Alamos.