untruss

(redirected from untrussing)

un·truss

 (ŭn-trŭs′)
tr.v. un·trussed, un·truss·ing, un·truss·es
1. To release from being trussed up.
2. Obsolete To undress.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

untruss

(ʌnˈtrʌs)
vb
1. (tr) to release from or as if from a truss; unfasten
2. obsolete to undress
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un•truss

(ʌnˈtrʌs)
Archaic. v.t.
1. to unfasten or untie; undo; loose from or as if from a truss.
2. to undress.
v.i.
3. to undress.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

untruss


Past participle: untrussed
Gerund: untrussing

Imperative
untruss
untruss
Present
I untruss
you untruss
he/she/it untrusses
we untruss
you untruss
they untruss
Preterite
I untrussed
you untrussed
he/she/it untrussed
we untrussed
you untrussed
they untrussed
Present Continuous
I am untrussing
you are untrussing
he/she/it is untrussing
we are untrussing
you are untrussing
they are untrussing
Present Perfect
I have untrussed
you have untrussed
he/she/it has untrussed
we have untrussed
you have untrussed
they have untrussed
Past Continuous
I was untrussing
you were untrussing
he/she/it was untrussing
we were untrussing
you were untrussing
they were untrussing
Past Perfect
I had untrussed
you had untrussed
he/she/it had untrussed
we had untrussed
you had untrussed
they had untrussed
Future
I will untruss
you will untruss
he/she/it will untruss
we will untruss
you will untruss
they will untruss
Future Perfect
I will have untrussed
you will have untrussed
he/she/it will have untrussed
we will have untrussed
you will have untrussed
they will have untrussed
Future Continuous
I will be untrussing
you will be untrussing
he/she/it will be untrussing
we will be untrussing
you will be untrussing
they will be untrussing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been untrussing
you have been untrussing
he/she/it has been untrussing
we have been untrussing
you have been untrussing
they have been untrussing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been untrussing
you will have been untrussing
he/she/it will have been untrussing
we will have been untrussing
you will have been untrussing
they will have been untrussing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been untrussing
you had been untrussing
he/she/it had been untrussing
we had been untrussing
you had been untrussing
they had been untrussing
Conditional
I would untruss
you would untruss
he/she/it would untruss
we would untruss
you would untruss
they would untruss
Past Conditional
I would have untrussed
you would have untrussed
he/she/it would have untrussed
we would have untrussed
you would have untrussed
they would have untrussed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"Wait a minute, we'll make him tidy first," and Lizaveta Petrovna laid the red wobbling thing on the bed, began untrussing and trussing up the baby, lifting it up and turning it over with one finger and powdering it with something.
The untrussing of her latest collection is not just of a poet coming to terms with a failed marriage and the hopes attached to a new love, but also an untrussing of memory and place.
Dekker makes use of one of Jonson's own characters to conduct the untrussing: Jonson's Captain Tucca reappears in Dekker's play to attack Horace.
The "untrussings" they engage in act more or less transparently as attacks.
Yet another confirmation that Marston was involved in the composition of Histriomastix comes from Thomas Dekker, who implies that Marston collaborated with him on Satiromastix, or the Untrussing of the Humorous Poet in 1601, when he writes that "the Poetasters untruss'd Horace" ("To the World" l.
`Satiromastix,' therefore, appears to be the literary title, and `The Untrussing of the Humorous Poet' the theatrical." (26) Bowers' suspicion is bolstered by a contemporary witness: Edward Pudsey refers to the play as "The Untrussing of the Humorous Poet" in his commonplace book.
27 Thomas Dekker, Satiromastix, or The Untrussing of the Humorous Poet (London, 1602), sig.
First, by not clarifying whether Lucio recognizes the Duke in the disguise of a friar, Shakespeare allows for the possibility that, in fact, Lucio does know of the Duke's "mad, fantastical trick" of "usurp[ing] the beggary he was never born to" (3.2.90), a phrase that some scholars have read as Lucio's recognition of the Duke's mendicant friar status.(51) Lucio's words, then, can be read as more than just pointless defamation of character: they can be read as his attempt to impress upon an absent ruler, whom he recognizes, the need to "return" (3.2.167) and save the life of a young man, who would be executed for the forgivable crime of "untrussing" (3.2.173): "Why, what a ruthless thing is this in [Angelo], for the rebellion of a codpiece to take away the life of a man!
About 1601, Thomas Dekker brought the so-called "War of the Theatres" to its culmination with his Satiromastix or The Untrussing of the Humorous Poet, which presents a thinly veiled caricature of Ben Jonson as the character Horace--his own self-chosen persona from The Poetaster of the previous year.
Dekker answered with Satiromastix, or The Untrussing of the Humorous Poet in 1602, but Jonson did not take up the stage aspects of the war again.