unusably

unusably

(ʌnˈjuːzəblɪ)
adv
in such a way as to be unusable
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Such works are incredibly important to the work that historians do, and without them scholars are often left with an unusably vast historiography that never quite comes together.
They are not overly elaborate like those found on an Ml928 Thompson, unusably fine like a PPS-43, nor barbarically crude, as found on a Sten Gun.
The paper states that "although sharp price does not predict unusably low future returns, they do predict a heightened probability of a crash".
Hastings's readiness to drop a line of inquiry that challenges the terms of law is troubling; the caricature of the 'post modern' position (at least in the terms supplied for him by Holmes) as irremediably and unusably indeterminate is quite inaccurate.
The source noted that these air raids were unusably meant to support their allies, affirming that the army and popular committees, along with loyal citizens of Taiz, are determined to purge the remaining pro-coalition elements of Taiz.
It is among camareros and transborder traders that we find the strongest social network, notwithstanding the fact that their relationships are strictly professional: if merchandise is misplaced or becomes unusably wet, the camareros are forced to pay for it.
I was renting a house with, let's just say, the basic amenities and although it had a bathroom it was unusably cold in winter and rarely had water in summer when the pressure wasn't strong enough to push it all the way up the hill to the house.
That's fine for laptops, desktops, and routers, but it's hard to cram that much radio technology into a battery-powered mobile device without making the time between charges unusably brief.
Too often, attempts to define "numeracy" result in hopelessly vague definitions of numeracy that are either unusably unclear or overlap so extensively with "mathematics" or "number sense and problem solving" that we add nothing to the discussion by using the new word "numeracy" to relabel a perfectly acceptable existing term, such as "mathematics."
Without workarounds, biodiesel faces cold-weather issues since it becomes unusably gelatinous as the temperature approaches freezing.
Roger views both Dale's effort and physical creation itself as "waste"; he considers Dale's project a "crass attempt" to comprehend a universe that is "unusably vast" (17) and meaningless, disconnected from a God who is hidden, unreachable; he considers Dale's proposal to be merely another version of the futile "towers of Babel" humans have built to God (22).