unusualness


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un·u·su·al

 (ŭn-yo͞o′zho͞o-əl)
adj.
Not usual, common, or ordinary.

un·u′su·al·ly adv.
un·u′su·al·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unusualness - uncommonness by virtue of being unusualunusualness - uncommonness by virtue of being unusual
uncommonness - extraordinariness as a consequence of being rare and seldom encountered
strangeness, unfamiliarity - unusualness as a consequence of not being well known
usualness - commonness by virtue of not being unusual
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He made one laugh sometimes by speaking the truth, but this is a form of humour which gains its force only by its unusualness; it would cease to amuse if it were commonly practised.
Nobody seemed to notice the unusualness of a Martini at midnight, though Daylight looked sharply for that very thing; for he had long since learned that Martinis had their strictly appointed times and places.
But Tom Haggin knew its unusualness. "Proper affinities," he declared, and repeatedly declared, with warm voice and moist eyes of appreciation.
Then there were white railings and white gates all about, and glittering weathercocks of various design, and garden-walks paved with pebbles in beautiful patterns,--nothing was quite common at Garum Firs; and Tom thought that the unusual size of the toads there was simply due to the general unusualness which characterized uncle Pullet's possessions as a gentleman farmer.
What the upholders of all these positions missed was the unusualness of what was happening in India and what Jinnah was actually trying to do.
Fried understood the unusualness of promissory obligation and hence the shaky foundation that emphasizing promise places beneath contract law.
The Court in Graham looked to the international community to evaluate the cruelty and unusualness of Florida's sentencing practice.
The fact that he does not comment on the unusualness of the situation may be related not only to his erroneous comprehension of the Tartar world, but also to the medieval lack of clear distinctions between the holy and the unholy in Christianity.
Filmed in a documentary style on location in New York City, the film begins with the narrator (producer Mark Hellinger) almost apologizing for its unusualness. This seems odd today, now that we are blase to location shooting and the subsequent convention of unsteady, handheld cameras to simulate documentary realism, but the style of Naked City, perhaps realism in movies in general, was very edgy in 1948.
Linguistic unusualness is amplified by combining peculiar terms into more peculiar adjectival composites.
Originality refers to the infrequency and unusualness of the response.