unvaryingly


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unvaryingly

(ʌnˈvɛərɪɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a never changing manner
References in classic literature ?
It was impossible to have lived with her fifteen years and not be aware that an unselfish clinging to the right, and a sincerity clear as the flower-born dew, were her main characteristics; indeed, Godfrey felt this so strongly, that his own more wavering nature, too averse to facing difficulty to be unvaryingly simple and truthful, was kept in a certain awe of this gentle wife who watched his looks with a yearning to obey them.
The man whose prosperity she had shared through nearly half a life, and who had unvaryingly cherished her--now that punishment had befallen him it was not possible to her in any sense to forsake him.
Often, after a dreary trip round the offices of the music-publishers, she would howl bitterly in secret, and even gnaw her pillow in the watches of the night; but in public her pride kept her unvaryingly bright and cheerful.
1986) ("In those cases where the beneficiary alleged mismanagement or other errors in the administration of the estate, the courts have unvaryingly held that such objections do not violate the no-contest clause.")); see also In re Estate of Kruse, 86 Cal.
The effects of living without status are also unvaryingly gendered.
Taking her examples across several decades of cinema, Mulay inarguably--and hence uninterestingly--contends that "[t]hough the portrayal of White and Black women differed to some extent in Anglo-American and European cinema at certain times, both unvaryingly portrayed women as objects of masculine desire" (385).
From unvaryingly checking the balls, bouncing the ball before a serve, or twisting the rackets before a return - these are the rituals that a tennis player is often seen doing during matches.
Determined to make a full identification of Chekhov's disdain for marriage with the unhappy spouses in his fiction, conventional scholarship unvaryingly points to "The Lady with the Little Dog." The story concerns an adulterous couple whose experience of shared intimacy is so deep it can only be described in marital terms: "they loved each other like tender friends, like husband and wife" (143; all subsequent short story quotations are from Chekhov, Tales of Anton Chekhov).
Obviously, though, this grim trajectory is not one that all past societies followed unvaryingly to completion: different societies collapsed to different degrees and in somewhat different ways, while many societies didn't collapse at all.
They note the heterogeneity of religious and cultural communities that are mistakenly treated as unvaryingly committed to restrictive views.
He liked nothing better than to stand for hours on the bridge of a ship in a raging Atlantic gale, issuing orders in the almost unvaryingly calm voice I remember, and sustaining himself with a biscuit and a mug of tea.