unverbalized


Also found in: Thesaurus.

unverbalized

(ʌnˈvɜːbəˌlaɪzd) or

unverbalised

adj
not verbalized or put into words
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unverbalized - not made explicitunverbalized - not made explicit; "the unexpressed terms of the agreement"; "things left unsaid"; "some kind of unspoken agreement"; "his action is clear but his reason remains unstated"
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"
References in periodicals archive ?
Duterte echoing a hitherto unverbalized radical change in Filipino religious belief and discourse?
A powerful but unverbalized moment when a dying person invites us to witness her experience along with her also occurs in the 2011 documentary How to Die in Oregon.
To get the answer we must draw on our experience with psychoanalytic patients who reach back to very early phenomena and yet who can verbalize (when they feel they can do so) without insulting the delicacy of what is preverbal, unverbalized, and inverbalizable except in poetry.
On the other hand, intuitive physical therapists rely much on unverbalized cues and hunches, defining the solution regarding fit.
* Another example of unverbalized doubt functioning as a question occurred when Valeria tried to figure out how to make a chair that would be both attractive and solid.
This gives the therapist access to the unverbalized and unverbalizable realms of the client's experience.
perform an emergent, formulative function because they come from that unconscious, previously unverbalized layer representing group sentiments and beliefs.
(20.) I normally use implicit to designate the existential, perhaps unverbalized, convictions of ordinary Christians in contrast to the explicit theology taught in catechetical and other educational settings.
Likewise, B can be unverbalized when it is irrelevant or unknown.
Maslow states, Many aspects of this inner, deeper nature are either (a) actively repressed, as Freud has described, because they are feared or disapproved of or are ego-alien, or (b) forgotten" (neglected, unused, overlooked, unverbalized or suppressed) ...
Relativists deny this possibility, saying that such skills are irrelevant to this bridge-building, because they are shared with other species that do not possess language, and that it is wrong in principle to mix unverbalized learning with what is communicated by language.
Linehan (1993a) describes six levels of validation: listening and observing (i.e., maintaining attentive), accurate reflection (i.e., succinctly summarizing a client's expressions in session), articulating the unverbalized (i.e., verbalizing to the client what may be felt, but has not been stated, and therefore demonstrating that the therapist is actively concerned with the client's emotions), validating past events (i.e., assisting clients in understanding the consequence of past events or biological predisposition), validating current events (i.e., normalizing a behavior in the current context), and radical genuineness (i.e., interacting with the client as capable and not fragile).