unwandering

unwandering

(ʌnˈwɒndərɪŋ)
adj
1. not wandering or roving, remaining in one place
2. not straying; constant
References in periodicals archive ?
in order that, by observing the circuits (periodous) of intellect in heaven, we might use them for the orbits of thinking (dianeseos) within us, which are akin (sungeneis) to those, the disturbed to the undisturbed; and by having thoroughly learned them and partaken of the natural correctness in their calculations, thus imitating the utterly unwandering circuits of the god, we might stabilize the wander-stricken circuits in ourselves.
Huck offers also an apt illustration of what Wallace calls in another context (1993: 181) "unwandering wandering", moving out and yet returning, by virtue of focusing at all times on the home from which one departs.
Presumably, the elder poet will be admired for his ability to take wing, to grapple with and exhaust his subject, just as Keats does his "good fish." For if the predatory pursuit of most people merely extends their condition of embodiment, the kind of gorging Keats describes allows the poet to sublimate his identity into that of the "poetical character." The poet who pounces and gorges upon beauty to the producing of essential verse elevates his existence over that of "The greater part of Men [who] make their way with the same instinctiveness, the same unwandering eye from their purposes, the same animal eagerness as the Hawk" (Letters 2: 79).