unwarped


Also found in: Legal.
Related to unwarped: unwrapped

unwarped

(ʌnˈwɔːpt)
adj
1. not twisted out of shape
2. not biased or perverted
Translations
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Rather carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs.
Latterly he had seen only Life, felt only the great passionate pulse of existence, unwarped, uncontorted, untrammelled by those creeds which futilely attempt to check what wisdom would be content to regulate.
"It is strange," pursued he, "that while I love Rosamond Oliver so wildly--with all the intensity, indeed, of a first passion, the object of which is exquisitely beautiful, graceful, fascinating--I experience at the same time a calm, unwarped consciousness that she would not make me a good wife; that she is not the partner suited to me; that I should discover this within a year after marriage; and that to twelve months' rapture would succeed a lifetime of regret.
Most prominently, the home of the Elliots, Clara's self-sufficient cousins, is a refuge to Clara after her backbreaking labours as a maid-of-all-work: 'The carpet was faded and piano old, but the hearts in that little cottage were warm, and the minds unwarped by prejudice or ostentation'.
Using SPM12 (Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, London, UK), data were realigned and unwarped, coregistered to the individual participants' T1 scans, and normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) template.
So Hardy's narrator, his own tale's counterweight, constantly gestures toward a "great passionate pulse of existence, unwarped, uncontorted, untrammeled," hers in his imagining, as if he cannot tolerate the events he transcribes, and must conjure the pulse of her "might have been" life, playing devil's advocate to the "tragic machinery" he represents (Tess 124; Jude 7).
Melville characteristically alters this precept in depicting the cabin-boy Pip's figurative descent, "carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs" (466).
As Zizek notes, the Real, understood as a horrifying confrontation with what exceeds and disintegrates symbolic formations, is "well known in literature in its multiple guises, from Poe's maelstrom and Kurtz's 'horror' at the end of Conrad's Heart of Darkness to Pip from Melville's Moby-Dick who, cast to the bottom of the ocean, experiences the demon God [...] 'the unwarped primal world'" (Puppet 66).
Rather carried down alive to wondrous depths, where strange shapes of the unwarped primal world glided to and fro before his passive eyes; and the miser-merman, Wisdom, revealed his hoarded heaps; and among the joyous, heartless, ever-juvenile eternities, Pip saw the multitudinous, God-omnipresent, coral insects, that out of the firmament of waters heaved the colossal orbs.
("Psychoanalysis and the Lacanian Real: 'Strange shapes of the unwarped primal world'", 208-210)
So Ishmael attributes to Pip some notion of the "unwarped," and is thus taken in (unlike Pip, Ahab?) by an all-too-pure representation of origin.
The new technology considers the entire topological pattern of each print and transforms it to a standard coordinate system, allowing it to be "unwarped".