unweeded

unweeded

(ʌnˈwiːdɪd)
adj
not weeded; not having been removed of weeds
References in periodicals archive ?
I was about to compare it to this unweeded garden; but here all is still" (Valperga, 262).
Within the West's domestic politics, we are being haunted by "things rank and gross in nature" within "an unweeded garden", that is full of "insidious intent." These poisonous things have names.
The garden centre car parks are filling up faster than an unweeded flower bed so it must be time for our annual splurge on prettying up our plots and patios.
Alden goes on to say that "Doyle's actual role in nurturing [Hesse's] early art and experimentation--and dare I say this out loud?--Doyle's early influence--not to mention his role as a foil or artistic counter-type for Hesse--remains, critically speaking, an unweeded garden" (19).
Which is not to say, however, that it is highly reliable; concern that it may not be is heightened by the (scanty) secondary literature, which depicts NADDIS as an unselective, unweeded repository of unsubstantiated allegations, often dated.").
Pleas from park user groups for the council to do more to empty overflowing litter bins have been met with official refusals, flowerbeds are unplanted and unweeded, and the overall impression is that the Labour council doesn't really care about the local environment.
'Tis an unweeded garden That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature Possess it merely.
This brand new world was already diagnosed at the beginning of the seventeenth century, by the Bard whose age straddled a disappearing world--this "unweeded garden", possessed by "things rank and gross in nature" was then just emerging and Shakespeare witnessed just the beginning of the replacement of the Kingdom of God with that of the Kingdom of Man (which would then become the kingdom of Machine)--yet he knew that the sacred has been disjointed from the world as never before.
Keywords: Hemingway grace under pressure unweeded garden world war I
She writes with brilliance and conviction of the suspicion and brutality that Posthumous directs at his beloved, Imogen, in Cymbeline; of the jealousy that destroys the loving family in The Winter's Tale; of the cultural precariousness of the marital family in The Duchess of Malfi, and of the fraternal rivalry that renders Elsinore an unweeded garden in Hamlet.