unwelcomed

unwelcomed

(ʌnˈwɛlkəmd)
adj
not welcomed
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 1976, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (1) has been interpreted as supporting a cause of action on the part of employees against their employers for harm caused by unwelcomed conduct of a sexual nature.
(11) In Meritor, the Supreme Court stated that the conduct, first of all, must be unwelcomed, and then emphasized that it must be so severe and pervasive as to "alter the conditions of [the victim's] employment and create an abusive working environment." (12)
Oklahoma, (28) the plaintiff, a correctional food service supervisor, alleged that her supervisor engaged in offensive and unwelcomed sexual conduct over a period of time.
Regardless of what we as preachers like to think or what our signboards out front say, there are all kinds of subtle and overt ways in which people feel unwelcomed by the church.
Gumbleton best captures the vacuous ineptitude of these groups that seek to enable same-sex genital sexual behavior when he said, "I just don't understand why we in the church would turn them away or create such an atmosphere that they would feel totally unwelcomed." The church hasn't, but unfortunately Gumbleton and U.S.
If the romantic relationship between a supervisor and a subordinate is determined to be unwelcomed, the employer is automatically held accountable for sexual harassment by the supervisor.(29) Although a supervisor may believe the relationship is consensual, the potential for a sexual harassment claim still exists, because the sexual advances or activity may nevertheless be considered unwelcome.(30)