unwilful

unwilful

(ʌnˈwɪlfʊl)
adj
1. accidental; not deliberate
2. complaisant or obliging; not obstinate or wilful
References in periodicals archive ?
"Something happened that was perhaps misunderstood in some quarters, perhaps misinterpreted in other quarters, some of it wilful, some of it unwilful."
Due to continuous anomalies spanning over decades, there exists a black economy which is bigger in size than the declared economy, through wilful or unwilful default of the tax assessments.
He literally wrote: "The real intention of individual persons involved in gradual transfers makes it impossible to objectively determine their possible willful or unwilful co-operation towards the alleged evasion of the tax advantage when it is possible to expect from them to give purposeful testimonies to defend themselves from suspicion from other criminal activity."Palombi initially demanded return of the apartments in court - in a trade dispute that was underway since December 2014.
To see "blue" in a wasp's nest, especially on the side of a skyscraper (and more especially when you just dreamt you were a dock) is not an act of alienation or defiance, it is an unwilful and emotionally pure picture--blue for sky or hope or whatever's new.
It is also her first book, and one of which she may well be proud, for her research has been careful and minute, and her scholarship is presented unencumbered by wilful -- or unwilful -- obscurities.