unworded

unworded

(ʌnˈwɜːdɪd)
adj
not expressed in words
References in classic literature ?
She knew that this beloved garden was to be the scene of the binding words that must seal their as yet unworded understanding.
Hillis Miller reminds us in another context, is "the presentation, in the narrator's past tense language, of the present-tense language of the character, or, sometimes of the character's unworded interiority.
In an article in Encounter (May 1970), British broadcaster Robin Day pointed to one of the defining emergent features of broadcast TV: its reliance on, and domination by, an endless flow of briefly glimpsed but often highly charged images, the impact of which eclipses their verbal or textual correlates and is often deemed most "powerful" when silent, or unworded. "Words on TV," he wrote, "tend to have their own limitations.
These clinical moments suggest layers of analysis, some of which are unworded.
A stranger is not difficult to distinguish in Iowa City and in the United States in general, where, despite their apparent diversity, there is an unworded solidarity among people, in their appearance, in the way they walk, they speak, they look, that is intended to demarcate those who have not belonged to this society and who probably never will.
For instance Cowart suggests that DeLillo in his prose is very aware of the existence of "the linguistic analogue to particle theory: what remains invisible because unworded and unwordable" (184).
The time adverbials "now, again, yet, until, at last, yet again" measure minimal spatial relations, "exploring just how curtailed and restricted the meanings of such terms can become when allowed to function only within the limits of spatial context." (12) The overview of this unworded journey cuts off almost aggressively all the moral, emotional, religious, psychological implications of progress (becoming), paring down all traditional metaphysical associations to the point where personal "history"/progress becomes a series of shifts, gropings in space:
dies they are unworded. Maybe I should have shot the kid and then myself
Menacing,/monumental shadows master what we see./Wait: the wish of reason is revered./The poet aims her words at what's unworded,/startled by the horizon's vaporous wall.
The constant dialogue between them is telepathic, unworded, automatic.
Along these lines, it is easy to grasp the dualism that inheres in ellipsis and the resultant division into functional (with the predicate left unworded) and constituent ellipsis (with the argument(s) left unworded); and easier still to doubt the raison d'etre of Shopen and Swieczkowski's harboring the notion of obligatory ellipsis, and hence deletion, in otherwise deviant strings like the following:
and there were times later when, musing, the thought occurred to him that possibly if it had not been for her he would not actually have attempted it--this a mere feeling, unworded, since he could not have phrased this either: that who to know what Capone's uncandled bridehood she might not have dreamed to be her destiny and fate, what fast car filled with authentic colored glass and machine guns, running traffic lights.