unworkable

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un·work·a·ble

 (ŭn-wûr′kə-bəl)
adj.
Not workable, especially not capable of being put into practice successfully; not practicable: an unworkable scheme.

un·work′a·bil′i·ty, un·work′a·ble·ness n.
un·work′a·bly adv.

unworkable

(ʌnˈwɜːkəbəl)
adj
not practicable or feasible
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unworkable - not capable of being carried out or put into practiceunworkable - not capable of being carried out or put into practice; "refloating the sunken ship proved impracticable because of its fragility"; "a suggested reform that was unfeasible in the prevailing circumstances"
impossible - not capable of occurring or being accomplished or dealt with; "an impossible dream"; "an impossible situation"

unworkable

adjective impracticable, unfeasible, unachievable, impossible, out of the question, unattainable Washington is unhappy with the peace plan, which it views as unworkable.

unworkable

adjective
1. Not capable of happening or being done:
2. Incapable of being used or availed of to advantage:
Translations

unworkable

[ˈʌnˈwɜːkəbl] ADJ
1. [plan, suggestion] → impracticable, no viable
2. [mine] → inexplotable

unworkable

[ˌʌnˈwɜːrkəbəl] adj [plan, proposal, system, law] → impraticable

unworkable

adj scheme, ideaundurchführbar; lawnicht durchsetzbar; landnicht nutzbar; (Min) minenicht abbaubar

unworkable

[ʌnˈwɜːkəbl] adj (plan) → inattuabile
References in periodicals archive ?
Stone's elaborate explication of extraConstitutional language is further testimony to how "interstate commerce" had replaced, unworkably narrowed, and generally confused the meaning of what the Framers had arguably understood "commerce among the several states" to mean in the first place.
(288) By policing the process of appropriating funds to ensure affordability is considered, a court need not worry that the tuition price it mandates is unworkably low at some universities, while a windfall for others.
As Brian Doherty relays, (19) the NYU Law Review published an article showing that, in the relevant law, the UK's Contempt of Court Act 1981, "both the definition of contempt and the extent of the public affairs exemption are unworkably vague." Joanna Armstrong Brandwood, the author of the detailed critique, writes:
Laws against hate speech are unworkably subjective and widely abused.
Past a certain point, though, the tone starts deteriorating, sounding hoarse and becoming unworkably unstable and wobbly.
As with all such unworkably complex schemes for standardization, the ultimate result inevitably settles at the lowest common denominator, not the highest.
Regrettably, in this case, the district court's erroneous and devastating spoliation rulings serve to confirm the worst fears of lawyers and organizational litigants, endorsing an unworkably expansive interpretation of preservation duties together with an unreasonable application of the most severe sanctions when those duties are not met.
Efforts to "audit the Fed" range from the unworkably intrusive to the sensible and valuable--the question is not whether but how, as well as by whom, and how frequently, under what circumstances, and with what output.
(190) A strong dissent to the decision called the ruling unworkably vague and inconsistent with the language of IDEA, which requires services to be provided in conformity with or in accordance with the IEP.
Worst case, the final rules will be unworkably burdensome.
Their singularity makes them unworkably slow, a clot in the flow of networked information.