updraught

(redirected from updraughts)
Related to updraughts: downdraught, updraft

updraught

(ˈʌpˌdrɑːft) or

up-draft

n
(General Physics) an upward movement of air or other gas. Also: up-current
Translations

updraught

updraft (US) [ˈʌpdræft] Ncorriente f ascendente

updraught

, (US) updraft
nZug m; (Aviat) → Aufwind m, → Aufströmung f
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the meantime, updraughts in the storm cloud continue to travel upwards, giving the top of the cloud a positive charge.
The distances between the boundary layer rolls correspondingly increase to about 12 km and the height of the peak updraughts is raised to just under 4 km.
Kestrels hung motionless on the updraughts beyond the cliff 's edge, and the silence created a blissful tranquillity.
They are the reason why hang gliders and eagles will head toward this type of cloud, knowing that it is a celestial signpost for the updraughts that give them lift.
Observations show when water vapour is taken up by the atmosphere through evaporation, the updraughts can either rise to 15 km to form clouds that produce heavy rains or rise just a few kilometres before returning to the surface without forming rain clouds.
The crashes are usually because the land rises imperceptibly into a largely featureless expanse, an area prone to sudden cloud, mist, updraughts and crosswinds.
Updraughts of air lead to rapid movement with ice and water particles rubbing against each leading to a massive build-up of static.
Also on This Day: 1478: Birth of humanist andstatesman Sir Thomas More; 1863: the HMS Orpheus was wrecked on the New Zealand coast with 185 people dying; 1964: the Beatles arrived in America for the first time; 1976: Joan Bazely became the first woman football referee of a male match at Croydon, Surrey; 1989: sardines rained over the Australian town of Ipswich as a violent storm caused updraughts to take the fish from shallow waters into the atmosphere.
To create a supercell, take a storm where wind speed increases with height, while wind direction veers; a situation in which updraughts and downdraughts within the thunderstorm can support each other's existence rather than cancel each other out.
By visual inspection of these variables, evidence of updraughts could be seen in both wind speed and mixing ratio at several locations marked by the grey areas in the figure.
novelist Charles Dickens; 1886: The richest gold reef in the world was discovered by George Walker, an Englishman, in Transvaal, South Africa; 1989: Sardines rained over the Australian town of Ipswich as violent storms caused updraughts to take the fish from shallow waters into the atmosphere; 1990: An amendment to Article Six of the Soviet Union's constitution, claiming 'full authority to government', announced the first step towards democracy.
How storms develop such immense amounts of electric charge is still not fully understood, but the most likely way is by raindrops carried skywards in updraughts in the clouds.