uplandish

uplandish

(ˈʌpləndɪʃ)
adj
of or relating to the uplands
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1538, it is believed, Leland went across Worcestershire, making his way from the county town to Droitwich, Bromsgrove and then Alvechurch, which he described as "a pretty uplandish town" with a pretty thoroughfare at the bottom of which was a brook the River Arrow.
From Alvechurch, he went on to Norton, King's Norton, another pretty uplandish town, where there were some fair houses owned by wool staplers (merchants) and a fair church with a goodly spire of stone over the bell frame.
But this does not prevent the Utopians from intervening in nature when it suits them: they transplant forests, for example, in order to place them closer to water to facilitate the movement of timber (84); and of course Utopia owes its very existence to an act of extreme geographical intervention: Utopus's digging up of the "uplandish ground" to form the island (50) (the moment that Marin saw as a literal "birth" of the nation).
Who else would inhabit the "next land" to them but the progeny of their own ancestors, from whom Utopus severed them when he caused that uplandish ground between them to be dug up?
Heywood claims to not criticize the carnage left by Bunduca and her forces, despite the fact that "the wild uplandish crew of her irregular troopes, spared nothinge, quicke or dead: thirst of revenge in her, and rapine in them, banisht all humanity" (Exemplary 82).
In the 16th century John Leyland described the village as "Norton is a pretty uplandish town in Worcestershire.
The disquisition consists of an astonishingly vivid portrait of a north-country labourer, 'the barbarous uplandish Jenking with torne hose, and clouted bootes, foule shurt, and thredbare bonet, long lockes, and crumpled handes, and gryned, scurvy countenaunce' (sig.
The martyrologist does emulate Tyndale as he understands him when he assimilates Jack Upland, another Lollard satire, into his encyclopedic collection as an ancient treatise compiled by Geoffrey Chaucer by way of a dialogue or questions moved in the person of a certain uplandish and simple plowman of the country." If it were not for publication by Foxe and Day, this Lollard text might have fallen in to oblivion because it is otherwise extant in only two copies of a circa 1536 edition.
is described (line 10) as |townysche [|" towny", bourgeois, uncourtly' according to Kinsley; elsewhere the word is opposed to uplandish or rustic; for Lydgate's association of the world with gawping simplicity see [OED.sup.2] s.v.