uproot

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Related to uprootedness: cajolingly, prudentially, reassessing

up·root

 (ŭp-ro͞ot′, -ro͝ot′)
tr.v. up·root·ed, up·root·ing, up·roots
1. To pull up (a plant and its roots) from the ground.
2. To destroy or remove completely; eradicate.
3. To force to leave an accustomed or native location.

up·root′ed·ness n.
up·root′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

uproot

(ʌpˈruːt)
vb (tr)
1. to pull up by or as if by the roots
2. to displace (a person or persons) from native or habitual surroundings
3. to remove or destroy utterly
upˈrootedness n
upˈrooter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

up•root

(ʌpˈrut, -ˈrʊt)

v.t.
1. to pull out by or as if by the roots.
2. to destroy or eradicate as if by pulling out roots.
3. to displace or remove violently, as from a home, country, customs, or way of life.
v.i.
4. to become uprooted.
[1610–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

uproot


Past participle: uprooted
Gerund: uprooting

Imperative
uproot
uproot
Present
I uproot
you uproot
he/she/it uproots
we uproot
you uproot
they uproot
Preterite
I uprooted
you uprooted
he/she/it uprooted
we uprooted
you uprooted
they uprooted
Present Continuous
I am uprooting
you are uprooting
he/she/it is uprooting
we are uprooting
you are uprooting
they are uprooting
Present Perfect
I have uprooted
you have uprooted
he/she/it has uprooted
we have uprooted
you have uprooted
they have uprooted
Past Continuous
I was uprooting
you were uprooting
he/she/it was uprooting
we were uprooting
you were uprooting
they were uprooting
Past Perfect
I had uprooted
you had uprooted
he/she/it had uprooted
we had uprooted
you had uprooted
they had uprooted
Future
I will uproot
you will uproot
he/she/it will uproot
we will uproot
you will uproot
they will uproot
Future Perfect
I will have uprooted
you will have uprooted
he/she/it will have uprooted
we will have uprooted
you will have uprooted
they will have uprooted
Future Continuous
I will be uprooting
you will be uprooting
he/she/it will be uprooting
we will be uprooting
you will be uprooting
they will be uprooting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been uprooting
you have been uprooting
he/she/it has been uprooting
we have been uprooting
you have been uprooting
they have been uprooting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been uprooting
you will have been uprooting
he/she/it will have been uprooting
we will have been uprooting
you will have been uprooting
they will have been uprooting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been uprooting
you had been uprooting
he/she/it had been uprooting
we had been uprooting
you had been uprooting
they had been uprooting
Conditional
I would uproot
you would uproot
he/she/it would uproot
we would uproot
you would uproot
they would uproot
Past Conditional
I would have uprooted
you would have uprooted
he/she/it would have uprooted
we would have uprooted
you would have uprooted
they would have uprooted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.uproot - move (people) forcibly from their homeland into a new and foreign environmentuproot - move (people) forcibly from their homeland into a new and foreign environment; "The war uprooted many people"
displace - cause to move, usually with force or pressure; "the refugees were displaced by the war"
2.uproot - destroy completely, as if down to the roots; "the vestiges of political democracy were soon uprooted" "root out corruption"
destroy, destruct - do away with, cause the destruction or undoing of; "The fire destroyed the house"
3.uproot - pull up by or as if by the rootsuproot - pull up by or as if by the roots; "uproot the vine that has spread all over the garden"
stub - pull up (weeds) by their roots
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

uproot

verb
1. displace, remove, exile, disorient, deracinate the trauma of uprooting them from their homes
2. pull up, dig up, root out, weed out, rip up, grub up, extirpate, deracinate, pull out by the roots fallen trees which have been uprooted by the storm
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

uproot

verb
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَقْتَلِع
vytrhnout i s kořeny
uppræta; rífa upp meî rótum
išrauti su šaknimis
izraut ar saknēm
vytrhnúť aj s koreňmi
kökünden sökmek

uproot

[ʌpˈruːt] VTdesarraigar, arrancar (de raíz); (= destroy) → eliminar, extirpar
whole families have been uprootedfamilias enteras se han visto desarraigadas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

uproot

[ʌpˈruːt] vt
[+ plant, tree] → déraciner
[+ family, refugees] → déraciner
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

uproot

vt plantentwurzeln; (fig: = eradicate) evilausmerzen; uprooted by the wardurch den Krieg entwurzelt; he uprooted his whole family (from their home) and moved to New Yorker riss seine Familie aus ihrer gewohnten Umgebung und zog nach New York
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

uproot

[ʌpˈruːt] vtsradicare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

uproot

(apˈruːt) verb
to pull (a plant etc) out of the earth with the roots. I uprooted the weeds and burnt them.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
This seemingly simple concept captures for Bunkse the essence of human existence and provides support for coping with a sense of insecurity and uprootedness of exile as it is "fundamental to our ability to survive--of finding a niche or a place for safety, nourishment, and survival, as well as migrating or propagating to other places".
Either I became an immigrant, a label implying that uprootedness was not only a choice but a welcome one at that, and yet the only label available if I were to stay outside Chile's borders, or I returned to a homeland where my sacrifice would not be celebrated, revered, or respected.
Contribution to the warsha/workshop "Navigating Uprootedness and Displacement: Called to Transforming Discipleship in a Context of Racism and Xenophobia," Arusha, Tanzania, 9 March 2018 (notes from author).
In other words, Infernal Affairs conveys a sense of cultural uprootedness or adriftness through its cinematic choices, which symbolizes the existential and emotional status of Hong Kong as a former colony caught between a British and a Chinese culture.
What characterizes Cuban culture is mutability, uprootedness
is closely connected with uprootedness and superfluousness which have been the curse of the modern masses...
After describing the familial and social structures through which individuals are "rooted" so as to achieve moral, intellectual, and spiritual stability, Weil examines factors contributing to its opposite, what she calls "uprootedness." Because she is writing during the Second World War, Weil focuses on contemporary causes of uprootedness, such as military conquest and colonialism.
An Oregon Humanities Conversation with Manuel Padilla, who will address issues of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception and integration, and how to build more responsive communities.
Tusiani's continuous feeling of "uprootedness" lies primarily within this context of never having fully "spiritually" assimilated into the American culture.
The West, even if it is a dying West, as epitomized by Mountain City, seems to retain its potential for rebirth and renewal, healing Martin's uprootedness and providing him with a sense of loyalty and attachment to a dying community that he regards as his homeplace.