uproot

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Related to uprootedness: cajolingly, prudentially, reassessing

up·root

 (ŭp-ro͞ot′, -ro͝ot′)
tr.v. up·root·ed, up·root·ing, up·roots
1. To pull up (a plant and its roots) from the ground.
2. To destroy or remove completely; eradicate.
3. To force to leave an accustomed or native location.

up·root′ed·ness n.
up·root′er n.

uproot

(ʌpˈruːt)
vb (tr)
1. to pull up by or as if by the roots
2. to displace (a person or persons) from native or habitual surroundings
3. to remove or destroy utterly
upˈrootedness n
upˈrooter n

up•root

(ʌpˈrut, -ˈrʊt)

v.t.
1. to pull out by or as if by the roots.
2. to destroy or eradicate as if by pulling out roots.
3. to displace or remove violently, as from a home, country, customs, or way of life.
v.i.
4. to become uprooted.
[1610–20]

uproot


Past participle: uprooted
Gerund: uprooting

Imperative
uproot
uproot
Present
I uproot
you uproot
he/she/it uproots
we uproot
you uproot
they uproot
Preterite
I uprooted
you uprooted
he/she/it uprooted
we uprooted
you uprooted
they uprooted
Present Continuous
I am uprooting
you are uprooting
he/she/it is uprooting
we are uprooting
you are uprooting
they are uprooting
Present Perfect
I have uprooted
you have uprooted
he/she/it has uprooted
we have uprooted
you have uprooted
they have uprooted
Past Continuous
I was uprooting
you were uprooting
he/she/it was uprooting
we were uprooting
you were uprooting
they were uprooting
Past Perfect
I had uprooted
you had uprooted
he/she/it had uprooted
we had uprooted
you had uprooted
they had uprooted
Future
I will uproot
you will uproot
he/she/it will uproot
we will uproot
you will uproot
they will uproot
Future Perfect
I will have uprooted
you will have uprooted
he/she/it will have uprooted
we will have uprooted
you will have uprooted
they will have uprooted
Future Continuous
I will be uprooting
you will be uprooting
he/she/it will be uprooting
we will be uprooting
you will be uprooting
they will be uprooting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been uprooting
you have been uprooting
he/she/it has been uprooting
we have been uprooting
you have been uprooting
they have been uprooting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been uprooting
you will have been uprooting
he/she/it will have been uprooting
we will have been uprooting
you will have been uprooting
they will have been uprooting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been uprooting
you had been uprooting
he/she/it had been uprooting
we had been uprooting
you had been uprooting
they had been uprooting
Conditional
I would uproot
you would uproot
he/she/it would uproot
we would uproot
you would uproot
they would uproot
Past Conditional
I would have uprooted
you would have uprooted
he/she/it would have uprooted
we would have uprooted
you would have uprooted
they would have uprooted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.uproot - move (people) forcibly from their homeland into a new and foreign environmentuproot - move (people) forcibly from their homeland into a new and foreign environment; "The war uprooted many people"
displace - cause to move, usually with force or pressure; "the refugees were displaced by the war"
2.uproot - destroy completely, as if down to the roots; "the vestiges of political democracy were soon uprooted" "root out corruption"
destroy, destruct - do away with, cause the destruction or undoing of; "The fire destroyed the house"
3.uproot - pull up by or as if by the rootsuproot - pull up by or as if by the roots; "uproot the vine that has spread all over the garden"
stub - pull up (weeds) by their roots
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"

uproot

verb
1. displace, remove, exile, disorient, deracinate the trauma of uprooting them from their homes
2. pull up, dig up, root out, weed out, rip up, grub up, extirpate, deracinate, pull out by the roots fallen trees which have been uprooted by the storm

uproot

verb
Translations
يَقْتَلِع
vytrhnout i s kořeny
uppræta; rífa upp meî rótum
išrauti su šaknimis
izraut ar saknēm
vytrhnúť aj s koreňmi
kökünden sökmek

uproot

[ʌpˈruːt] VTdesarraigar, arrancar (de raíz); (= destroy) → eliminar, extirpar
whole families have been uprootedfamilias enteras se han visto desarraigadas

uproot

[ʌpˈruːt] vt
[+ plant, tree] → déraciner
[+ family, refugees] → déraciner

uproot

vt plantentwurzeln; (fig: = eradicate) evilausmerzen; uprooted by the wardurch den Krieg entwurzelt; he uprooted his whole family (from their home) and moved to New Yorker riss seine Familie aus ihrer gewohnten Umgebung und zog nach New York

uproot

[ʌpˈruːt] vtsradicare

uproot

(apˈruːt) verb
to pull (a plant etc) out of the earth with the roots. I uprooted the weeds and burnt them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because she is writing during the Second World War, Weil focuses on contemporary causes of uprootedness, such as military conquest and colonialism.
An Oregon Humanities Conversation with Manuel Padilla, who will address issues of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception and integration, and how to build more responsive communities.
The characters, who are marked by their uprootedness and ethnic difference, are situated in the U.
The West, even if it is a dying West, as epitomized by Mountain City, seems to retain its potential for rebirth and renewal, healing Martin's uprootedness and providing him with a sense of loyalty and attachment to a dying community that he regards as his homeplace.
Many of them suffer distress and violence linked to poverty, uprootedness, and exclusion.
Ultimately, Cassin shows how contemporary philosophy opens up the political stakes of rootedness and uprootedness, belonging and foreignness, helping us to reimagine our relations to others in a global and plurilingual world.
The model of mission that fits the diaspora initiatives is thus the Johannine version--"as the Father has sent me, so I send you" (John 20:21)--with its implications of humble service and vulnerability, because it follows the incarnation principle: "Christ's life and ministry included the travail of a refugee, the pain of uprootedness, and the alienation that comes with being a stranger.
The author was keenly and painfully aware of the sense of uprootedness that his father Nick experienced in America and its consequences on the family.
In other words, if the human condition is one of uprootedness to begin with--as modernism claims--then the hobo-hero at least retains a sense of agency unavailable to his static counterparts" (2009: 40).
utter uprootedness, exile, the impossibility of presence, dispersion" (The Writing 34).
Nonetheless, in A Thousand Plateaus, the inspiration for such a binary reading, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari clearly refer to smooth space as the frequent locus of war and uprootedness (see, for example, 474 and 490).