upsides


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upsides

(ˈʌpˌsaɪdz)
adv
informal chiefly (foll by with) Brit equal or level (with), as through revenge or retaliation
References in classic literature ?
One funny thing about the Scoodlers was they could walk in either direction, coming or going, without turning around; because they had two faces and, as Dorothy said, "two front sides," and their feet were shaped like the letter T upside down.
She found some tiny canisters upon the dresser, labeled "Rice," "Coffee?" "Sago"; but when she turned them upside down there was nothing inside except red and blue beads.
The servant brought back his tumbler turned upside down,* with an unfinished bit of nibbled sugar, and asked if anything more would be wanted.
He turned it upside down, but nothing came out, which surprised him very much.
The church had a slender-spired dome that rounded inward at its base, and looked like a turnip turned upside down, and the hackman seemed to be dressed in a long petticoat with out any hoops.
Verily, it seemeth to me, thou art a fool, or else I myself am one: and quietly and quickly will I Put thy 'truth' upside down.
Presently she would go and do things among the beehives; and after that, if that brought no solace, she would go in and turn the house upside down and get dusty and tired.