upsurgence

upsurgence

(ʌpˈsɜːdʒəns)
n
an upsurge, increase, or rise
References in periodicals archive ?
"Ooh, thank you!" More and more people are finding old forgotten rolls of film in the attic, Lydon explains, leading to an upsurgence in never-seen-before Pistols memorabilia.
Liberalism has been on the side of passivism, in the face of danger; it has been on the side of appeasement, when confronted with aggressive acts of injustice; and finally, in America today, as in England yesterday, liberalism has been on the side of "isolation" when confronted with the imminent threat of a worldwide upsurgence of barbarism.
(15) Such views, while extreme, were nevertheless in keeping with a diminished postwar faith in the notion that immigrants were capable of being "Americanized." This was reflected, too, in the upsurgence of the virulent antiblack, anti-immigrant, antisemitic and anti-Catholic views espoused by the newly ascendant Ku Klux Klan, which had a large following in Michigan during the 1920.
a decision may be made as to whether and how God and gods withhold their presence and the night remains, whether and how the day, of the holy dawns, whether and how in the upsurgence of the holy an epiphany of God and the gods can begin a new ....
Revolution, though inspired by a new upsurgence of hope and faith, would also bring a great deal of suffering and good reason to doubt the myths of time as progress and of modernization as happiness.
is that the upsurgence of apeiron - far from indelibly spelling the demise of human individuality, actually offers us the opportunity to bring it to fruition."
This tension had become apparent in the upsurgence of "pan movements" (Pan-German and Pan-Slav) in which the nation had colonized the state.
Heidegger's "meditations on the technological reduction of human beings to mere stockpiles [and] on the upsurgence of evil and malignancy in the wake of the departed gods ...