uptear

uptear

(ˈʌpˌtɛə)
vb (tr)
1. to pull or rip up by or as if by the roots
2. to tear into pieces
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References in periodicals archive ?
(26) In particular, h e shared the Romantic's notion of natural and human interaction, as well as his abhorrence of bloody, insensate deeds, and he would have applauded the concluding vision of "Salisbury Plain," composed at Windy Brow in 1793-94, had he only known it: Heroes of Truth pursue your march, uptear Th' Oppressor's dungeon from its deepest base; High o'er the towers of Pride undaunted rear Resistless in your might the herculean mace Of Reason; let foul Error's monster race Dragged from their dens start at the light with pain And die; pursue your toils, till not a trace Be left on earth of Superstition's reign, Save that eternal pile which frowns on Sarum's plain.
Even though the Margaret of The Ruined Cottage very much resembled the down and out female tramp of Salisbury Plain in her final poverty and emotional destituteness, for instance, Wordsworth fell much short of his own former self who would call upon the "Heroes of Truth" to "pursue [their] march" and "uptear / Th'Oppressor's dungeon from its deepest base" (Salisbury Plain 541, 541-42).