urbanity

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Related to urbanities: urbanites

ur·ban·i·ty

 (ûr-băn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. ur·ban·i·ties
1. Refinement and elegance of manner; polished courtesy.
2. urbanities Courtesies; civilities.

urbanity

(ɜːˈbænɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality of being urbane
2. (usually plural) civilities or courtesies

ur•ban•i•ty

(ɜrˈbæn ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
the quality of being urbane; refined courtesy or politeness; suavity.
[1525–35; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.urbanity - polished courtesyurbanity - polished courtesy; elegance of manner
good manners, courtesy - a courteous manner
2.urbanity - the quality or character of life in a city or town; "there is an important difference between rusticity and urbanity"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
gaucherie, rusticity - the quality of being rustic or gauche

urbanity

noun sophistication, culture, polish, charm, grace, courtesy, elegance, refinement, civility, worldliness, suavity, mannerliness He had all the charm and urbanity of the trained diplomat.

urbanity

noun
Refined, effortless beauty of manner, form, and style:
Translations

urbanity

[ɜːˈbænɪtɪ] Nurbanidad f, cortesía f

urbanity

n (of person, manner)weltmännische Art, Gewandtheit f, → Urbanität f (geh); (= civility)Höflichkeit f; (of manner, words)Verbindlichkeit f
References in periodicals archive ?
Grounding her analysis in the comparative cultural studies developed by Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, particularly as related to the "in-between peripherality" of Central Europe between the West and the Soviet Union, she addresses what imagery the cities use to express their urbanities, memory and forgetting of pre-1989 pasts, and city images conveyed in post-1989 literature and film (as set in Berlin and Warsaw particularly).
Finally, "The Big City" renders a new emigre's fantastic chase after self-discovery through a metropolis modeled on New York, replete with kaleidoscopic urbanities out of Fritz Lang or Terry Gilliam's Brazil.
Crank My Tractor," a song about a woman from the country who falls for a city guy, provides a fitting analogy for the emigration of many middle-class urbanities to new country's post-1980s pop/rock-oriented incarnation.