urchin


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Related to urchin: sea urchin, sea urchin sting

ur·chin

 (ûr′chĭn)
n.
1. A playful or mischievous youngster; a scamp.
2. A sea urchin.
3. Archaic A hedgehog.

[Middle English urchone, hedgehog, from Old French erichon, from Vulgar Latin *ērīciō, ērīciōn-, from Latin ērīcius, from ēr.]

urchin

(ˈɜːtʃɪn)
n
1. a mischievous roguish child, esp one who is young, small, or raggedly dressed
2. (Animals) See sea urchin, heart urchin
3. (Animals) an archaic or dialect name for a hedgehog
4. (Mechanical Engineering) either of the two cylinders in a carding machine that are covered with carding cloth
5. (European Myth & Legend) obsolete an elf or sprite
[C13: urchon, from Old French heriçon, from Latin ēricius hedgehog, from ēr, related to Greek khēr hedgehog]

ur•chin

(ˈɜr tʃɪn)

n.
1. a mischievous boy.
2. any small boy or youngster.
4. Chiefly Brit. Dial. hedgehog.
[1300–50; Middle English urchun, urchon hedgehog < Old North French (h)erichon, Old French heriçun < Vulgar Latin *hēricionem, acc. of *hēriciō, for Latin ēricius]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.urchin - poor and often mischievous city childurchin - poor and often mischievous city child
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
ragamuffin, tatterdemalion - a dirty shabbily clothed urchin
guttersnipe, street urchin - a child who spends most of his time in the streets especially in slum areas

urchin

noun (Old-fashioned) ragamuffin, waif, guttersnipe, brat, mudlark (slang), gamin, street Arab (offensive), young rogue We were in the bazaar with all the little urchins watching us.
Translations
ولَد شَقي
uličník
gadedreng
götustrákur
vaikėzas
resgalis
haylaz oğlanyaramaz çocuk

urchin

[ˈɜːtʃɪn] Npilluelo/a m/f, golfillo/a m/f
sea urchinerizo m de mar

urchin

[ˈɜːrtʃɪn] ngarnement m

urchin

nGassenkind nt; (mischievous) → Range f

urchin

[ˈɜːtʃɪn] nmonello/a

urchin

(ˈəːtʃin) noun
a mischievous, usually dirty or ragged, child, especially a boy. He was chased by a crowd of urchins.
References in classic literature ?
At last one took the other aside, and said, 'That little urchin will make our fortune, if we can get him, and carry him about from town to town as a show; we must buy him.
One urchin shall hereafter be a doctor, and administer pills and potions, and stalk gravely through life, perfumed with assafoetida.
The door, which moved with difficulty on its creaking and rusty hinges, being forced quite open, a square and sturdy little urchin became apparent, with cheeks as red as an apple.
David Blythe had sent his horse and buggy to meet them, and the urchin who had brought it slipped away with a sympathetic grin, leaving them to the delight of driving alone to their new home through the radiant evening.
One slipper was nowhere to be found; the other had been laid hold of by an urchin, and off he ran with it; he thought it would do capitally for a cradle when he some day or other should have children himself.
Next, I caught sight of a little urchin of about ten--a boy who would have been good-looking but for the fact that his face was pinched and sickly.
This was a great event, a tremendous era, in Nathaniel Pipkin's life, and it was the only one that had ever occurred to ruffle the smooth current of his quiet existence, when happening one fine afternoon, in a fit of mental abstraction, to raise his eyes from the slate on which he was devising some tremendous problem in compound addition for an offending urchin to solve, they suddenly rested on the blooming countenance of Maria Lobbs, the only daughter of old Lobbs, the great saddler over the way.
There was not an urchin in school but was perishing to have a glimpse of it, but the chance never came.
Your mere puny stripling, that winced at the least flourish of the rod, was passed by with indulgence; but the claims of justice were satisfied by inflicting a double portion on some little tough wrong headed, broad-skirted Dutch urchin, who sulked and swelled and grew dogged and sullen beneath the birch.
mischievous urchins,' I shall go away and break with you altogether.
I was told that there were still smaller ones, but they had been lost by some little cannibal urchins, the priest's children, who had stolen them to play marbles with.
As they were entering it, the wicked one, who is the author of all mischief, and the boys who are wickeder than the wicked one, contrived that a couple of these audacious irrepressible urchins should force their way through the crowd, and lifting up, one of them Dapple's tail and the other Rocinante's, insert a bunch of furze under each.