utilitarianism


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u·til·i·tar·i·an·ism

 (yo͞o-tĭl′ĭ-târ′ē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief that the value of a thing or an action is determined by its utility.
2. The ethical theory proposed by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill that all action should be directed toward achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people.
3. The quality of being utilitarian: housing of bleak utilitarianism.

utilitarianism

(juːˌtɪlɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the morally correct course of action consists in the greatest good for the greatest number, that is, in maximizing the total benefit resulting, without regard to the distribution of benefits and burdens
2. (Philosophy) the theory that the criterion of virtue is utility

u•til•i•tar•i•an•ism

(yuˌtɪl ɪˈtɛər i əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the ethical doctrine that virtue is based on utility, and that conduct should be directed toward promoting the greatest happiness of the greatest number of persons.
2. utilitarian quality or character.
[1820–30]

utilitarianism

the ethical doctrine that virtue is based upon utility and that behavior should have as its goal the procurement of the greatest happiness for the greatest number of persons. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Ethics
the philosophical tenets set forth by John Stuart Mill based on the principle of “the greatest good for the greatest number” and holding that the criterion of virtue lies in its utility. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

utilitarianism

A philosophical school of thought arguing that ethics must be based on whatever brings the greatest amount of good to the greatest number of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utilitarianism - doctrine that the useful is the good; especially as elaborated by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill; the aim was said to be the greatest happiness for the greatest number
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

utilitarianism

[ˌjuːtɪlɪˈtɛərɪənɪzəm] Nutilitarismo m

utilitarianism

n (Philos) → Utilitarismus m
References in classic literature ?
In the earlier series of books containing, among others, Bosanquet's "History of Aesthetic," Pfleiderer's "Rational Theology since Kant," Albee's "History of English Utilitarianism," Bonar's "Philosophy and Political Economy," Brett's "History of Psychology," Ritchie's "Natural Rights," these objects were to a large extent effected.
But knockers may be muffled for other purposes than those of mere utilitarianism, as, in the present instance, was clearly shown.
She had not, indeed, surrendered her money; in that there would have been a romantic or monkish abandon quite alien to her masterful utilitarianism. She held her wealth, she would say, for use upon practical social objects.
Utilitarianism in its origins was strongly connected with classical liberalism, a view that stresses individual freedom.
The ethical theories that will be used to support and oppose the ethical mandate that a child's assent to participate in research that does not have the potential to directly benefit the child are deontology and utilitarianism.
Robin, elicits a moral evaluation within the philosophical views of justice, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, and deontology.
There were silly statements about hamburgerology and irrelevant references to the vile traduction of our erstwhile peerless education system by grim utilitarianism. Learning was an end in itself, and academic rigour the only real benchmark.
Yet utilitarianism insists that if it is not beneficial to apply the law in particular cases, we should not do so.
predicates its every action upon this identifiable paradigm of preemption and utilitarianism: it must instigate the Third Invasion sanctioning any and all costs to its small band of troopers to ensure the continued subsistence of greater humanity.
In Utilitarianism Mill explores his Utilitarian beliefs, which are mainly influenced by Jeremy Bentham and his own father.
(271.) The most important philosophical approaches or normative justifications for copyright law are: instrumentalism or utilitarianism, natural rights based principally on Locke, and moral rights based on Kant and Hegel.