utterable


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ut·ter 1

 (ŭt′ər)
tr.v. ut·tered, ut·ter·ing, ut·ters
1. To send forth with the voice: uttered a cry.
2. To articulate (words); pronounce or speak: uttered "yes."
3. Law To put (counterfeit currency or a forged check or instrument) into circulation: utter a bad check.
4. Obsolete To offer (merchandise) for sale; sell.

[Middle English utteren, partly from Middle Low German uteren (from uter, outer, comparative of ūt, out; see ud- in Indo-European roots) and alteration (influenced by utter, outer) of Middle English outen, to disclose (from out, out; see out).]

ut′ter·a·ble adj.
ut′ter·er n.

ut·ter 2

 (ŭt′ər)
adj.
Complete; absolute; entire: utter nonsense; utter darkness.

[Middle English, from Old English ūtera, outer; see ud- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.utterable - capable of being uttered in words or sentencesutterable - capable of being uttered in words or sentences
expressible - capable of being expressed; "an expressible emotion"
References in classic literature ?
In his vocabulary was no word for "crocodile"; yet in his thought, as potent as any utterable word, was an image of dreadful import--an image of a log awash that was not a log and that was alive, that could swim upon the surface, under the surface, and haul out across the dry land, that was huge-toothed, mighty-mawed, and certain death to a swimming dog.
A line's utterable difference from itself may harbor a mitosis or alienation that expresses, more than any one decisive realization could do, the speaker's radical truth.
It is my contention that technological optimism makes sustainable development intellectually utterable.
Years later, after Uncle Adelwarth has committed himself to the same sanatorium where he had once taken Cosmo Solomon, the narrator interprets his uncle's intractable depression as the consequence of his infallible but repressed memory, the intermittent and implicitly traumatic access to which has occasioned his barely utterable torments.
Injurious speech raises the questions of which words wound and which representations offend, suggesting that the focus ought to be on the "uttered, utterable, and explicit," (p.