uxorilocal


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Related to uxorilocal: virilocal, Uxorilocal marriage

uxorilocal

(ʌkˌsɔːrɪˈləʊkəl)
adj
(Anthropology & Ethnology) of or relating to living with the wife's tribe or family. Also: matrilocal
References in periodicals archive ?
Aberle calculated that matriliny is found in 15 per cent of societies and is associated with matrilocal or uxorilocal residence in 7 per cent of these.
As Yang notes, part of Yuan's authority derived from the fact that her marriage was uxorilocal. Still, her case shows how establishing a reputation of female exemplarity allowed women to make claims in arenas that did not normally allow for the vocal input of women, empowering them to fight for a cause that might otherwise be deemed self-serving.
In all cases, the duolocal residence pattern of the earlier periods, when a married man did not reside with his wife but visited her daily while residing with his own matriclan, has been transforming into a more uxorilocal pattern since the mid-twentieth century.
Orang Rimba social relations draw from a broader Malay system of terms and concepts that are adapted to fit their small and fluid camp structures, uxorilocal residence patterns, and egalitarian social relations that are based around a system of sharing.
Destacam-se na sua organizacao social, relacionada aos Je, as metades exogamicas e residencia uxorilocal. Kimiye Tommasino em seus escritos sobre os Kaingang observa essa dualidade.
Presumably we should ask similar questions about assimilation also in relation to uxorilocal marriage.
(41) El sistema de parentesco entre los cunas que habitan las islas de San Blas es bilineal, uxorilocal y de corte exogamico estricto, vease.
It seems probable, therefore, that Gou Wa's marriage will be uxorilocal, with the husband joining her family, rather than vice versa (vivilocality).
Prior to the 1600s when Taiwan was populated predominantly by aboriginal tribes, marriage was primarily uxorilocal: Property was handed down from mother to daughter and the son would "marry into" his wife's home; this was practiced in aboriginal communities of the coastal plain up through the twentieth century (Brown, 2004).
Before continuing, I should make it clear that while Schroter's fieldwork sites and my own are located some 10 to 15 kilometres apart, both are found in what I shall refer to--for want of a better designation--as 'greater Ngadhaland' where the vast majority routinely practise uxorilocal postmarital residence.