uxoriousness


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ux·o·ri·ous

 (ŭk-sôr′ē-əs, ŭg-zôr′-)
adj.
Excessively submissive or devoted to one's wife.

[From Latin uxōrius, from uxor, wife.]

ux·o′ri·ous·ly adv.
ux·o′ri·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.uxoriousness - foolish fondness for or excessive submissiveness to one's wifeuxoriousness - foolish fondness for or excessive submissiveness to one's wife
affectionateness, lovingness, fondness, warmth - a quality proceeding from feelings of affection or love
Translations

uxoriousness

nErgebenheit fseiner Frau gegenüber
References in periodicals archive ?
He maintains that, in spite of battling mental illness, and notwithstanding his uxoriousness, Philip showed real leadership.
The narrative of innocence and uxoriousness that Peter is trying to build for himself is difficult to believe, but if so proved, he will feel the most cheated.
For Andrea, the ways he imagines and hypothesizes Lucrezia's desires, motivations, and voice (of which, more anon) permit and even necessitate his uxoriousness and his artistic and ethical compromises.
his own fall into license, Specifically the uxoriousness brought about
In the opening scene, Pilate's masculinity is in a crisis due to his uxoriousness. The play begins with parallel speeches of Pilate and Procula, which are wholly the invention of the playwright(s) of the York cycle.
I've been in the same church my entire life." The faux uxoriousness hid an attempt to use his faithfulness to Mormonism, a negative in evangelical Protestant areas, to his advantage.
Was be an object lesson in the painful avoidance of uxoriousness? If so, this moment was again undermined as he knelt willingly like a human sacrifice on hearing the news that she had dispossessed him of his ring and conceived by him, a huge relief accompanying his submission.
His uxoriousness, while terrible, unveils the only potentially not terrible thing in him: a latent capacity to respond to another person.
(12) The widely circulated medieval versions of the story pick up on this hostility, embellishing the tale by intensifying both the first husband's uxoriousness and the widow's macabre and callous independence of him.
Gordon, an adjunct classics instructor and self-styled practicing Stoic in the manner of his Greek philosopher hero, Epictetus, suffers by his own admission from "uxoriousness" over his bride, whom he describes as "a paragon," "a jewel" who is "radiant, beautiful, kind ...
Uxoriousness (wife-fervor) implies dependency as well as a stream of elegantly tendered piropos ("Your breasts have the eyes of a gazelle").
Adam's praise, which verges more on idolatry than on the uxoriousness critics often point to, refers beyond the historical moment, namely his immoderate love of Eve that inclines him to fall, and alludes within the epic to the Son's boundless love for humanity.