vacant lot


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vacant lot - a lot on which there are no permanent buildingsvacant lot - a lot on which there are no permanent buildings
sandlot - a vacant lot used by city boys to play games
lot - a parcel of land having fixed boundaries; "he bought a lot on the lake"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The dancing pavilion was put up near the Danish laundry, on a vacant lot surrounded by tall, arched cottonwood trees.
That vacant lot soon became the most cheerful place in town.
They seemed especially interested in children and vacant lots. When I overtook them and stopped to say a word, I found them affable and confiding.
They crossed a bridge that ran over a tiny stream and passed another vacant lot in which corn grew.
Well, gracious sakes, she has a nerve," he muttered as he went along the street and passed a row of vacant lots where corn grew.
He glanced over into the vacant lot in which the little raving boys from Devil's Row seethed about the shrieking and tearful child from Rum Alley.
So far the weather had been fair, and he had slept out every night in a vacant lot; but now there fell suddenly a shadow of the advancing winter, a chill wind from the north and a driving storm of rain.
Next morning she was found, strangled, in a vacant lot.
One sweltering afternoon--it was the first day of July, 1830-- he was at work over a set of tangled account books in his workroom, which looked westward over a stretch of vacant lots, when a conversation outside disturbed him.
Over in the vacant lots was Jasper, young, coal black, and of magnificent build, sitting on a wheelbarrow in the pelting sun--at work, supposably, whereas he was in fact only preparing for it by taking an hour's rest before beginning.
Another source of income to Maria were her cows, two of them, which she milked night and morning and which gained a surreptitious livelihood from vacant lots and the grass that grew on either side the public side walks, attended always by one or more of her ragged boys, whose watchful guardianship consisted chiefly in keeping their eyes out for the poundmen.
It appears to serve the same purpose as certain signs that one sees and vacant lots in London -- "Rubbish may be shot here."