vacuum brake


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vacuum brake

n
(Railways) a brake system, used on British and many overseas railways, in which the brake is held off by a vacuum on one side of the brake-operating cylinder. If the vacuum is destroyed by controlled leakage of air or a disruptive emergency, the brake is applied. It is now largely superseded by the Westinghouse brake system
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Aimed at lessening the amount of pedal pressure required for braking, such electric brake boosters are fast supplanting mechanical vacuum brake boosters systems.
equipped The vacuum brake servo has been changed to give better feel and distribution of brake forces front to back.
Another smart component shown is the electric vacuum brake system, which combines the electric vacuum pump and vacuum sensor with the electric control unit (ECU) to produce appropriate negative pressure to enable auxiliary braking.
Some of the innovations it has developed include the use of Akulon PA6 resin for use in oil sumps and oil pans, the use of Arnitel TPC for the production of vacuum brake tubes in the latest Ford Fiesta, and similar applications in other Ford models.
Arnitel TPC (thermoplastic copolyester) has been selected by Ford for the production of vacuum brake tubes for the Ford Fiesta.
Typical automotive applications include vacuum brake tubing, air brake tubing, fuel tubing and convoluted tubing.
Rauch runs a couple of lines at its site for Hitachi, which makes vacuum brake lines and fuel-line hoses for the automotive industry.
Yet in little more than another year's time, the vacuum brake was a dead letter in the United States, and virtually all passenger trains had air brakes.
The manifold is sealed with a spin-welded end cap (which also serves as a mounting bracket for the vacuum brake booster).