vadose


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Related to vadose: vadose water

va·dose

 (vā′dōs′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being water that is located in the zone of aeration in the earth's crust above the groundwater level.

[Latin vadōsus, shallow, from vadum, a shallow, ford.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vadose

(ˈveɪdəʊs)
adj
(Physical Geography) of, relating to, designating, or derived from water occurring above the water table: vadose water; vadose deposits.
[C19: from Latin vadōsus full of shallows, from vadum a ford]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

va•dose

(ˈveɪ doʊs)

adj.
found or located above the water table: vadose water; vadose zone.
[1895–1900; < Latin vadōsus shallow]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Get Report Sample Copy@ https://www.marketresearchhub.com/enquiry.php?type=S&repid=2445487 A tensiometer in soil science is a measuring instrument used to determine the matric water potential in the vadose zone.
The health risk from microbial pathogens moving through soil depends on the proximity to drinking-water sources and dilution of microbes in the vadose zone (Stoddard et al.
Prior to his retirement in 2015, Eisenhauer was a professor in UNL's Department of Biological Systems Engineering, where he taught courses in irrigation systems management, irrigation laboratory and field study, soil and water resources engineering, modeling of vadose zone hydrology, hydrologic modeling of small watersheds, and soil conservation and watershed management.
Groundwater is hydrologically divided into: 1) Vadose water in the unsaturated zone, and 2) Water in the zone of saturation.
Winship, "Vadose zone flow model parameterisation using cross-borehole radar and resistivity imaging," Journal of Hydrology, vol.
Hopmans et al., "Modeling soil processes: review, key challenges, and new perspectives," Vadose Zone Journal, vol.
Nastev, "Numerical simulation of the radius of influence for landfill gas wells," Vadose Zone Journal, vol.
Four vadose monitoring probes go down 30 feet into the earth, detecting liquids that may get through landfill liner, Crepeau said.
Gravity drives dissolutional patterns in the unsaturated, vadose zone, while hydraulic potential dominates in the saturated, phreatic zone.
Friedman, "A review of advances in dielectric and electrical conductivity measurement in soils using time domain reflectometry," Vadose Zone Journal, vol.
Also, with SDI systems more uniform moisture distribution, in the vadose zone (than with drip irrigation systems), was observed, and thus drainage and surface evaporation were less with SDI [10,11].