vagary

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va·ga·ry

 (vā′gə-rē, və-gâr′ē)
n. pl. va·ga·ries
1. An unpredictable development or change of circumstances: the vagaries of mountain weather; the vagaries of business travel.
2. An extravagant or erratic notion or action: could not explain the vagaries of his behavior.

[From Latin vagārī, to wander, from vagus, wandering.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vagary

(ˈveɪɡərɪ; vəˈɡɛərɪ)
n, pl -garies
an erratic or outlandish notion or action; whim
[C16: probably from Latin vagārī to roam; compare Latin vagus vague]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

va•gar•y

(vəˈgɛər i, ˈveɪ gə ri)

n., pl. -gar•ies.
1. an unpredictable, capricious, or erratic action, occurrence, or course.
2. a whimsical, or unusual idea or notion.
[1620–30; appar. < Latin vagārī to wander]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vagary - an unexpected and inexplicable change in something (in a situation or a person's behavior, etc.)vagary - an unexpected and inexplicable change in something (in a situation or a person's behavior, etc.); "the vagaries of the weather"; "his wealth fluctuates with the vagaries of the stock market"; "he has dealt with human vagaries for many years"
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

vagary

noun (usually plural) whim, caprice, unpredictability, sport, urge, fancy, notion, humour, impulse, quirk, conceit, whimsy, crotchet, sudden notion a coat as a provision against the vagaries of the weather his fairly wide experience of women's vagaries
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

vagary

noun
An impulsive, often illogical turn of mind:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
päähänpisto

vagary

[ˈveɪgərɪ] N (= whim) → capricho m, antojo m; (= strange idea) → manía f, capricho m
the vagaries of lovelos caprichos del amor
the vagaries of the weatherlos caprichos del tiempo
it can't be left to the vagaries of chanceno se puede dejar al azar or en manos del azar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

vagary

[ˈveɪgəri] ncaprice m
the vagaries of the weather → les caprices du temps
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

vagary

n usu plLaune f; (= strange idea)verrückter Einfall; the vagaries of lifedie Wechselfälle pldes Lebens
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

vagary

[ˈveɪgərɪ] n (usu pl) → capriccio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
She had discovered that a lane opened out below the apple orchard and ran up through a belt of woodland; and she had explored it to its furthest end in all its delicious vagaries of brook and bridge, fir coppice and wild cherry arch, corners thick with fern, and branching byways of maple and mountain ash.
How he came to lend himself to the vagaries of such a set I cannot imagine."
Asked for reasons, I had none to give and fancied I saw in her expression a shade of contempt for the vagaries of a jealous mind.
Sometimes I think Wolf Larsen mad, or half-mad at least, what of his strange moods and vagaries. At other times I take him for a great man, a genius who has never arrived.
We did not think it hypocritical to draw over our vagaries the curtain of a decent silence.
And these vagaries are the harder to bear patiently, as becomes a man and an officer, because no sailor is really good-tempered during the first few days of a voyage.
But I take all the blame upon myself for never having told your worships of my uncle's vagaries, that you might put a stop to them before things had come to this pass, and burn all these accursed books- for he has a great number- that richly deserve to be burned like heretics."
While Captain Bonneville amused himself by observing the habits and characteristics of this singular class of men, and indulged them, for the time, in all their vagaries, he profited by the opportunity to collect from them information concerning the different parts of the country about which they had been accustomed to range; the characters of the tribes, and, in short, everything important to his enterprise.
We are all more or less familiar with the vagaries and eccentricities of frontier law, but this instance, it is thought, is unique.
But in his most convulsive struggles, and in the wildest vagaries of his intellect, when no other thought retained its sober influence, he still showed an awful solicitude lest the black veil should slip aside.
'Calls the domestic virtues vagaries!' exclaimed Eugene, raising his eyes to the ceiling.
I am as confident of seeing Frank here before the middle of January, as I am of being here myself: but your good friend there (nodding towards the upper end of the table) has so few vagaries herself, and has been so little used to them at Hartfield, that she cannot calculate on their effects, as I have been long in the practice of doing."