vaginal

(redirected from vaginal inflammation)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to vaginal inflammation: vulvovaginitis, Vulvar cancer, Lichen sclerosus

vag·i·nal

 (văj′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the vagina.
2. Relating to or resembling a sheath.

vag′i·nal·ly adv.

vag•i•nal

(ˈvædʒ ə nl)

adj.
1. pertaining to or involving the vagina.
2. pertaining to or resembling a sheath.
[1720–30]
vag′i•nal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vaginal - of or relating to the vaginavaginal - of or relating to the vagina; "vaginal suppository"
Translations
poševní
vajinal

vaginal

[vəˈdʒaɪnəl] ADJvaginal
vaginal smearfrotis m vaginal

vaginal

[vəˈdʒaɪnəl] adjvaginal(e)vaginal discharge npertes fpl vaginales, pertes fpl blanches

vaginal

adjvaginal, Scheiden-; vaginal intercoursevaginaler Geschlechtsverkehr; vaginal wallScheidenwand f

vaginal

[vəˈdʒaɪnl] adjvaginale

vag·i·nal

a. vaginal.
1. que posee forma de vaina;
2. rel. a la vagina;
___ bleedingsangrado ___, hemorragia ___;
___ candidiasiscandidiasis ___;
___ culturecultivo ___;
___ cystsquistes vaginales;
___ dischargeflujo ___;
___ drying treatmenttratamiento de secamiento ___;
___ itchingpicazón ___;
___ wall repairreparación de la pared de la ___;
___ tumortumor ___.

vaginal

adj vaginal
References in periodicals archive ?
Amsel R et al observed BV alone does not cause dysuria, dyspareunia, pruritus, burning, or vaginal inflammation (erythema, oedema).
One of the problems with radiotherapy for cervical cancer is that the vagina receives a high dose of radiotherapy, which can cause symptoms such as vaginal dryness, vaginal narrowing and shortening, with a loss of flexibility (stenosis), vaginal inflammation (mucositis), bleeding, or a hole in the wall of the vagina (vaginal fistula) - one of the most serious but rare complications.
In the OB group, most animals (n=18) had a local vaginal inflammation classified as (+) due to the slight resistance to remove the device, although noticeably lesser than for the sponges.
A total of 29% of the women had surgical complications, most often uterine or vaginal inflammation and anemia.
Preventing vaginal inflammation may prevent women from becoming infected with HIV, if studies on female macaques can be extrapolated to humans.