valerian

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Va·le·ri·an

 (və-lîr′ē-ən) Originally Publius Licinius Valerianus. Died c. ad 260.
Emperor of Rome (253-260) who, as coruler with his son Gallienus (c. 218-268), confronted invasions by the Goths and Persians. He was captured and killed by Persian forces (260).

va·le·ri·an

 (və-lîr′ē-ən)
n.
1. Any of several plants of the family Valerianaceae, especially Valeriana officinalis, native to Eurasia and widely cultivated for its small, fragrant, white to pink or lavender flowers and for use in medicine.
2. The dried rhizomes of Valeriana officinalis, used medicinally as a sedative.

[Middle English, from Old French valeriane, from Medieval Latin valeriāna, probably from feminine of Latin Valeriānus, of Valeria, Roman province where the plant originated.]

valerian

(vəˈlɛərɪən)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: allheal any of various Eurasian valerianaceous plants of the genus Valeriana, esp V. officinalis, having small white or pinkish flowers and a medicinal root
2. (Pharmacology) a sedative drug made from the dried roots of V. officinalis
[C14: via Old French from Medieval Latin valeriana (herba) (herb) of Valerius, unexplained Latin personal name]

Valerian

(vəˈlɛərɪən)
n
(Biography) Latin name Publius Licinius Valerianus. died 260 ad, Roman emperor (253–260): renewed persecution of the Christians; defeated by the Persians

va•le•ri•an

(vəˈlɪər i ən)

n.
1. any plant of the genus Valeriana, as the common valerian V. officinalis, having white, lavender, or pink flowers and a root that is used medicinally.
2. a drug consisting of or made from the root, formerly used as a nerve sedative and antispasmodic.
[1350–1400; Middle English valirian < Medieval Latin valeriāna]

Va•le•ri•an

(vəˈlɪər i ən)

n.
(Publius Licinius Valerianus), died A.D. c260, Roman emperor 253–60.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.valerian - a plant of the genus Valeriana having lobed or dissected leaves and cymose white or pink flowersvalerian - a plant of the genus Valeriana having lobed or dissected leaves and cymose white or pink flowers
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
genus Valeriana, Valeriana - genus of widely distributed perennial herbs and some shrubs
common valerian, garden heliotrope, Valeriana officinalis - tall rhizomatous plant having very fragrant flowers and rhizomes used medicinally
Translations
BaldrianBaldrianwurzel
길초근넓은잎쥐오줌풀발레리안서양쥐오줌풀쥐오줌풀
kozłek

valerian

[vəˈlɪərɪən] Nvaleriana f

valerian

nBaldrian m

valerian

[vəˈlɛərɪən] nvaleriana

valerian

n (bot) valeriana
References in classic literature ?
between the renowned Valerian (with one hand tied behind him,) and two gigantic savages from Britain.
After which the renowned Valerian (if he survive,) will fight with the broad-sword,
Marcellus Valerian (stage name--his real name is Smith,) is a
They used their knowledge to find the lost Valerians, undo some very wicked, ancient spells, and reunite a divided family.
Critique: An extraordinary and deeply absorbing read from beginning to end, "Linnets and Valerians" is a terrifically entertaining novel from beginning to end and showcases author Elizabeth Goudge's impressive storytelling abilities.
Considering results obtained in clinical trials investigating valerians effect on vigilance, psychomotor and cognitive functions as well as on hang over phenomenons, it can be ascertained that findings of our in vivo experiments (locomotor activity, ether-induced anaesthesia) comply with these data.
Despite intensive research efforts, the pharmacological actions accounting for the clinical efficacy of valerian remain unclear.
Up to maximum dosages of 500 or 1000mg/kg bw none of the valerian extracts displayed sedative effects.
Due to these findings it is proposed that not sedative but anxiolytic and antidepressant activity, which was elaborated particularly in the special extract phytofin Valerian 368, considerably contribute to the sleep-enhancing properties of valerian.
Only recently the therapeutic efficacy of valerian has been confirmed by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency in an actual monograph (Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC/EMEA), 2006).
It is commonly assumed that efficacy of valerian preparations in sleep disorders could be due to putative sedative properties of these extracts.
Many efforts have been made to elucidate the pharmacological profile of different valerian extracts as well as of isolated constituents.