valetudinarian


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Related to valetudinarian: viticetum

val·e·tu·di·nar·i·an

 (văl′ĭ-to͞od′n-âr′ē-ən, -tyo͞od′-)
n.
A sickly or weak person, especially one who is constantly and morbidly concerned with his or her health.
adj.
1. Chronically ailing; sickly.
2. Constantly and morbidly concerned with one's health.

[From Latin valētūdinārius, from valētūdō, valētūdin-, state of health, from valēre, to be strong or well; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

val′e·tu′di·nar′i·an·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

valetudinarian

(ˌvælɪˌtjuːdɪˈnɛərɪən) or

valetudinary

n, pl -narians or -naries
1. (Medicine) a person who is or believes himself to be chronically sick; invalid
2. (Medicine) a person excessively worried about the state of his health; hypochondriac
adj
3. (Medicine) relating to, marked by, or resulting from poor health
4. (Medicine) being a valetudinarian
5. (Medicine) trying to return to a healthy state
[C18: from Latin valētūdō state of health, from valēre to be well]
ˌvaleˌtudiˈnarianˌism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

val•e•tu•di•nar•i•an

(ˌvæl ɪˌtud nˈɛər i ən, -ˌtyud-)

n.
1. an invalid.
2. a person who is excessively concerned about his or her health.
adj.
3. in poor health; sickly; invalid.
4. excessively concerned about one's health.
5. of, pertaining to, or characterized by invalidism.
[1695–1705]
val`e•tu`di•nar′i•an•ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.valetudinarian - weak or sickly person especially one morbidly concerned with his or her health
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
Adj.1.valetudinarian - of or relating to or characteristic of a person who is a valetudinarian
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
болнав
ipocondriacovaletudinario

valetudinarian

[ˈvælɪˌtjuːdɪˈnɛərɪən]
A. ADJvaletudinario
B. Nvaletudinario/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

valetudinarian

(form)
nkränkelnde Person; (= health fiend)Gesundheitsfanatiker(in) m(f)
adj (= sickly)kränklich, kränkelnd; personsehr um seine Gesundheit besorgt; habits, attitudegesundheitsbewusst
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
By the invention of lingering death; for he had a mortal disease which he perpetually tended, and as recovery was out of the question, he passed his entire life as a valetudinarian; he could do nothing but attend upon himself, and he was in constant torment whenever he departed in anything from his usual regimen, and so dying hard, by the help of science he struggled on to old age.
Yes, I said; a reward which a man might fairly expect who never understood that, if Asclepius did not instruct his descendants in valetudinarian arts, the omission arose, not from ignorance or inexperience of such a branch of medicine, but because he knew that in all well-ordered states every individual has an occupation to which he must attend, and has therefore no leisure to spend in continually being ill.
But his eminence as a valetudinarian now made him an object of engrossing interest, and Mrs.
Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.
The tourist, the valetudinarian, or the amateur of the beauties of nature, who, in the train of his four-in-hand, now rolls through the scenes we have attempted to describe, in quest of information, health, or pleasure, or floats steadily toward his object on those artificial waters which have sprung up under the administration of a statesman* who has dared to stake his political character on the hazardous issue, is not to suppose that his ancestors traversed those hills, or struggled with the same currents with equal facility.
Before he reached middle life he was a valetudinarian. His household gradually became a constant visiting place for a number of young ladies toward whom he adopted a fatherly attitude and who without knowing it were helping him to prepare for his artistic success.
Canaris himself appeared less and less convincing as he became a stooped, haggard valetudinarian, living on reputation as an archaic god dangles by a mere thread of myth.
"Valetudinarians," he replied, and I knew he was itching for me to enquire what or who a valetudinarian might be.
The problem of money in politics is not a merely valetudinarian concern.
but when we go on to find the same man, on the same or similar grounds, abstain from nearly everything that his neighbours innocently and pleasurably use, and from the rubs and trials of human society itself into the bargain, we recognise that valetudinarian healthfulness which is more delicate than sickness itself.
Woodhouse was always "a nervous man" (6) and "a valetudinarian ...
Good health, for example, is a precondition of self-creation, and so liberalism must be valetudinarian. It turns out to offer a sense of purpose, order, and structure, just like the older forms of community, but through membership in the administration, the media, or the security services.