vallecula

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val·lec·u·la

 (vă-lĕk′yə-lə, və-)
n. pl. val·lec·u·lae (-lē′)
An anatomical depression or crevice, as between the hemispheres of the brain.

[Late Latin, diminutive of Latin vallēs, valley.]

val·lec′u·lar, val·lec′u·late (-lĭt, -lāt′) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vallecula

(vəˈlɛkjʊlə)
n, pl -lae (-ˌliː)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy any of various natural depressions or crevices, such as certain fissures of the brain
2. (Botany) botany a small groove or furrow in a plant stem or fruit
[C19: from Late Latin: little valley, from Latin vallis valley]
valˈlecular, valˈleculate adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

val•lec•u•la

(vəˈlɛk yə lə)

n., pl. -lae (-ˌli)
a groove or indentation in a plant or animal part.
[1855–60; < Late Latin, = Latin valle(s) valley + -cula -cule1]
val•lec′u•lar, val•lec′u•late` (-ˌleɪt, -lɪt) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vallecula - (anatomy) any furrow or channel on a bodily structure or part
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
costal groove - groove between the ribs where the nerves and blood vessels are
fissure - (anatomy) a long narrow slit or groove that divides an organ into lobes
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

val·lec·u·la

n. valécula, depresión, surco o fisura esp. en referencia a estructuras anatómicas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vallecula

n vallécula
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pharyngeal residue was defined as retention of the entire given material in the valleculae or pyriform sinuses after the swallow.
Endoscopic direct laryngoscopy using 700rigid telescope was carried out to examine the supraglottis, vocal cords, valleculae and the interarytenoid area.
Follow-up swallows resulted in aspiration of the residual contrast in her valleculae. She was deemed to be at high risk for aspiration when she ate food, and it was recommended that enteral nutrition be continued through the existing nasogastric tube.
We assessed 6 parameters for the diagnosis of dysphagia by FEES and VFSS: 1) premature spillage; 2) delay in initiation of swallowing; 3) residue of the bolus in the oropharynx after swallowing; 4) residue of the bolus in the hypopharynx after at least 3 swallows (i.e., saliva, secretions, or swallowed materials [contrast-enhanced in VFSS] accumulated in the valleculae, on the lateral or posterior pharyngeal walls, or in the piriform sinuses after deglutition); 5) laryngeal penetration (i.e., presence of contrast [VFSS] or food residues encroached in the airway, above the vocal folds with or without coughing [FEES]); and 6) laryngotracheal aspiration (i.e., presence of contrast-enhanced or noncontrast-enhanced materials below the vocal folds) (16,17).
Superiorly, the incision transects the valleculae along the posterior aspect of the hyoid bone.
A thorough clinical workup of all the patients was done (detailed history, general physical and systemic examination, complete nasal and paranasal sinuses examination, examination of ears, examination of larynx, external examination for obvious swelling, mobility of the laryngeal framework, laryngeal crepitus, tenderness, laryngeal expansion, and indirect laryngoscopy to examine posterior one-third of the tongue, valleculae, epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds, vestibular folds, vocal cords, pyriform fossae, and movements of the vocal cords).
[2] The following symptoms were considered indicative of OPD: poor bolus formation, liquid spilling from the mouth, liquid adhering to the tongue or hard palate or that entered the sulci, piecemeal deglutition, delayed oral and/or pharyngeal transit time, aspiration before/after swallowing, pooling in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses and/ or pharyngeal recesses, velopharyngeal incoordination, reduced pharyngeal motility and laryngeal penetration.
Significant bruising of his soft palate was seen, in addition to bruising and oedema of the soft tissues around the arytenoid cartilages with a small haematoma within the valleculae [Figure 1].
DISCUSSION: Cysts of the epiglottis are benign lesions, which can be found at any age, but with increased frequency in adults[1][2][3][4][5] The most common location for these lesions is the lingual surface of the epiglottis,[1][3][4] and less commonly, on the laryngeal surface.[1] Cysts arising from the lingual surface (epi-laryngeal) mostly consist of small masses which are confined to the sub-mucous layer and do not extend through the cartilage.[1] On mirror laryngoscopy, these epi-laryngeal cysts are described as solitary, spherical, or pedunculated swellings that occupy the valleculae.[1] On the other hand, cysts arising from the laryngeal surface (intra-laryngeal) have been classified as either simple or plunging cysts.[1] The simple cyst is the least common type of epiglottic cyst.