valour


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Related to valour: Valour or Valor

val·our

 (văl′ər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of valor.

valour

(ˈvælə) or

valor

n
courage or bravery, esp in battle
[C15: from Late Latin valor, from valēre to be strong]
ˈvalorous adj
ˈvalorously adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.valour - the qualities of a hero or heroinevalour - the qualities of a hero or heroine; exceptional or heroic courage when facing danger (especially in battle); "he showed great heroism in battle"; "he received a medal for valor"
braveness, bravery, courage, courageousness - a quality of spirit that enables you to face danger or pain without showing fear

valour

noun bravery, courage, heroism, spirit, boldness, gallantry, derring-do (archaic), fearlessness, intrepidity, doughtiness, lion-heartedness He was decorated for valour in the war.
fear, cowardice, timidity, weakness, dread, trepidation
Translations
شَجاعَه
udatnost
modtapperhed
hugrekki
bezbailībadrosme
udatnosť
cesaretyiğitlik

valour

valor (US) [ˈvæləʳ] N (frm) → valor m, valentía f

valour

[ˈvælər] (British) valor (US) ncourage m

valour

, (US) valor
n (liter)Heldenmut m (liter), → Tapferkeit f

valour

[ˈvæləʳ] valor (Am) n (liter) → valore m (coraggio)

valour

(ˈvӕlə) noun
courage or bravery, especially in battle. He displayed his valour on the battlefield.
References in classic literature ?
In conclusion, in mercenaries dastardy is most dangerous; in auxiliaries, valour. The wise prince, therefore, has always avoided these arms and turned to his own; and has been willing rather to lose with them than to conquer with the others, not deeming that a real victory which is gained with the arms of others.
Charles the Seventh,[*] the father of King Louis the Eleventh,[+] having by good fortune and valour liberated France from the English, recognized the necessity of being armed with forces of his own, and he established in his kingdom ordinances concerning men-at-arms and infantry.
There is a type of manly valour; but valour in a woman, or unscrupulous cleverness, is inappropriate.
"I will prevent it," said the gentleman; and going over to Don Quixote, who was insisting upon the keeper's opening the cages, he said to him, "Sir knight, knights-errant should attempt adventures which encourage the hope of a successful issue, not those which entirely withhold it; for valour that trenches upon temerity savours rather of madness than of courage; moreover, these lions do not come to oppose you, nor do they dream of such a thing; they are going as presents to his Majesty, and it will not be right to stop them or delay their journey."
The keeper, then, in full detail, and bit by bit, described the end of the contest, exalting to the best of his power and ability the valour of Don Quixote, at the sight of whom the lion quailed, and would not and dared not come out of the cage, although he had held the door open ever so long; and showing how, in consequence of his having represented to the knight that it was tempting God to provoke the lion in order to force him out, which he wished to have done, he very reluctantly, and altogether against his will, had allowed the door to be closed.
At first nothing was able to stand before the valour of the Portuguese, the Moors were driven from one mountain to another, and were dislodged even from those places, which it seemed almost impossible to approach, even unmolested by the opposition of an enemy.
Many knights, who had not sufficient confidence in their own skill to defy a single adversary of high reputation, were, nevertheless, desirous of displaying their valour in the general combat, where they might meet others with whom they were more upon an equality.