clarification

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clar·i·fy

 (klăr′ə-fī′)
v. clar·i·fied, clar·i·fy·ing, clar·i·fies
v.tr.
1. To make clear or easier to understand; elucidate: clarified her intentions.
2. To clear of confusion or uncertainty: clarify the mind.
3. To make clear by removing impurities or solid matter, as by heating gently or filtering: clarify butter.
v.intr.
To become clear.

[Middle English clarifien, from Old French clarifier, from Late Latin clārificāre : Latin clārus, clear; see clear + Latin -ficāre, -fy.]

clar′i·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
clar′i·fi′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clarification - an interpretation that removes obstacles to understanding; "the professor's clarification helped her to understand the textbook"
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"
disambiguation - clarification that follows from the removal of ambiguity
2.clarification - the act of removing solid particles from a liquid
improvement - the act of improving something; "their improvements increased the value of the property"

clarification

noun explanation, interpretation, exposition, illumination, simplification, elucidation I have written to the union asking for clarification of my position.

clarification

noun
2. The act or process of removing physical impurities:
Translations
تَوْضيح، تَفْسير
objasněnívysvětlení
præcisering
tisztázás
skÿring
açıkla ma

clarification

[ˌklærɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] Naclaración f

clarification

[ˌklærɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] nclarification f, éclaircissement m

clarification

n
(= explanation)Klarstellung f; the whole issue needs a lot more clarificationdie Sache bedarf noch der Klärung; I’d like a little clarification on this pointich hätte diesen Punkt gerne näher erläutert; in or as clarificationzur Klarstellung
(of wine)Klärungsprozess m

clarification

[ˌklærɪfɪˈkeɪʃn] nchiarificazione f, chiarimento

clarify

(ˈklӕrəfai) verb
to make or become clear (in meaning etc). Would you please clarify your last statement?
ˌclarifiˈcation (-fi) noun

clar·i·fi·ca·tion

n. aclaración, clarificación.
References in periodicals archive ?
The methods of law (Hodge and Gostin) clarify cases, establish precedents, and set legislation to instruct, debate, and reform, thereby newly to inform studies of values clarification. The historian's craft (Amundsen) reminds us of the multiple contexts recognized by the humanities that influence health, medical practices, and research that would expose the possibly oppressive or artificial effects of these contexts.
The first group received an information-only intervention (I) focusing on STD/ HIV prevention information, values clarification, and birth control.
For the past two decades recreational therapists have incorporated values clarification activities into leisure education programs.
In general, competing programs of moral education appeal to four basic methods for theoretical justification: behaviorism, values clarification, the cognitive-developmental approach, and character education.
Though there is disagreement on whether values clarification precedes role realignment or vice-versa (Beer, Eisenstat, & Spector, 1990) there is consensus in varied literature bases that mission and values are crucial (Corrigan, 1995; Drucker, 1992; Hamel, 1996; Rogan, 1993).
A method for discovering our own values is called values clarification, devised by Louis Raths.
The Report, in addition, lends itself beautifully to sixth grade "values clarification" discussions.
If this were not so, schools across the country would not have initiated and continued a battery of in-service and credit programs under such banners as "human relations education," "interpersonal relations," and "values clarification."
By turn, the "values analysis" program forwarded by the Association of Values Research (AVER), the "moral development approach" of Lawrence Kohlberg, and the "values clarification" techniques associated with Louis Raths, Sidney Simon, Merril Harmin, and Howard Kirschenbaum are dissected with a keen eye to uncovering not only their metaphysical underpinnings (Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche, respectively) but also the darker "flip sides" of these putatively progressive programs.
One form letter that surfaced in Utah lists 111 taboo subjects including: "Values Clarification," "Creative Problem Solving," "Self-Evaluation," "Moral Education," "Open-ended Discussion," "Astrology," "Drug Education," and "Group Dynamics."