vampirize

vampirize

(ˈvæmpaɪəˌraɪz) or

vampirise

vb (tr)
1. to suck blood from
2. to drain the vital essence from
References in periodicals archive ?
Beyond Danny's plotting for revenge, the image of the vindictive Transformer is evocative of the barely avertable role reversal through which "transformer-goods" daily vampirize their owners, turning them into bloodless exhibitors of consumables.
Even worse for civilization as we know it, some Cuscuta species vampirize coffee plants and grapevines.
Just as Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage) in Adaptation (Spike Jonze, 2002) realizes that having written himself into his own screenplay makes him into Ouroboros, the mythological snake eating its own tail, we are here dealing with a tendency of contemporary film narrative to vampirize itself, to take itself as its own object and to diegeticze its reflexivity in forms of mise-en-abime.
Arrabal's response to the potential for art to "vampirize", make sacred or otherwise distort a tragic event is to use the unexpected, the central element of his later panic theater, to open up space for the critical response of the audience.
The novel, then, implies that Sutpen's persona, his self and property, rests on what lies concealed beneath his beard--his ability to consume and vampirize another culture.
It is also to begin acknowledging the toll that the so-called "immaterial labour" of reading takes on subjects (Hardt and Negri 25)--how it can vampirize one's sensual and intellectual energies instead of replenishing them, as the romantic image of reading pleasure would have it.
It's adolescent, this desire of American poets to vampirize other people's suffering.
For example, the instrumentalization of animals for food is no longer an option for Rose after the change: her attempt to vampirize a cow is interrupted by vomiting (itself interrupted when the farmer barges in).
In this way, the metapoetic process of the poem negotiates a self-reflexively engaged protest poetry that does not vampirize its own subjects, as the poet/speaker imagines herself doing in the earlier surrealistic allegory, or reverse the paradigm of oppression in "trying to make power out of hatred and destruction."
Decidedly multidisciplinary, they engage and vampirize the system of fashion and consumer society in a way that takes up and expands on the historical Pop activities of "art directors" and artist-entrepreneurs from Claes Oldenburg, operator of the Ray Gun Mfg.
When he arrives in London he terrorizes the Westenra family and vampirizes Lucy.
The closeness between reader and writer becomes a species of pernicious possession in which the ancient magician vampirizes the youthful reader, and the narrator worries that the manuscript's yellowing pages provide a medium through which its old author could cast a spell to unload "a burthen of years" that would "settle in somber misery upon the heart and brain of him whose disastrous toil should succeed in decyphering [sic]" it (415).