vanadinite


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va·na·di·nite

 (və-nād′n-īt′, -năd′-, văn′ə-dē′nīt′)
n.
A red, yellow, or brown mineral, essentially an ore of vanadium and lead.

vanadinite

(vəˈnædɪˌnaɪt)
n
(Minerals) a red, yellow, or brownish mineral consisting of a chloride and vanadate of lead in hexagonal crystalline form. It results from weathering of lead ores in desert regions and is a source of vanadium. Formula: Pb5(VO4)3Cl

va•nad•i•nite

(vəˈnæd nˌaɪt, -ˈneɪd-)

n.
a mineral, Pb5(VO4)3Cl, that occurs in red or brownish crystals: an ore of lead and vanadium.
[1850–55; vanad (ium) + -in1 + -ite1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vanadinite - a mineral consisting of chloride and vanadate of lead; a source of vanadium
atomic number 23, vanadium, V - a soft silvery white toxic metallic element used in steel alloys; it occurs in several complex minerals including carnotite and vanadinite
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
References in periodicals archive ?
Data were reduced using the procedure of Pouchou and Pichoir (1985); the standards used were albite, sanidine, periclase, diopside, quartz, vanadinite, rutile, fluorite and synthetic oxides ([Al.
In this tent, too, I picked up two absolutely top-quality thumbnails of Moroccan vanadinite, and $50 was the price for the pair.
These include arsentsumebite, tsumebite, corkite, fornacite, duftite, caledonite, kettnerite, linarite, leadhillite, brochantite, mimetite, pyromorphite, vanadinite and wulfenite.
There were also annabergite from Laurium, Greece; kermesite from Pezinok, Slovakia; sphalerite from Banska Stiavnica (Schemnitz), Slovakia; chalcocite and olivenite from Cornwall, England; some top-class vanadinite specimens of recent vintage from Mibladen, Morocco; and a few dozen of the new mimetites from Badenweiler.
pyromorphite, hedyphane, phosphohedyphane and vanadinite.
In February he offered spectacular, self-collected vanadinite from the Apache mine in Arizona, in exceptionally large and dazzling crystals for the locality, at up to $40 (fairly pricey in those days) for an 8 X 14-inch cabinet specimen.
I have noticed that specimens of even vanadinite, deseloizite, and rhodonite, lose something of their initial brilliancy and intensity under the scourge of that actinic bombardment to which they become exposed in our halls.
Numerous dealers at this show, as at nearly all major shows these days, had superb specimens of (oh, let's see) Veracruz, Mexico amethyst; Moroccan vanadinite and cerussite; Pikes Peak, Colorado microcline (and even topaz); apophyllite, stilbite, calcite, scolecite, etc.
who worked with Elhuyar at the Academy, also furthered the mineral collection there, as well as writing a book on the elements of mineralogy (Elementos de Orictognosia) in 1795 and, in 1801, discovering the element vanadium in vanadinite from the Cardonal mine in Zimapan, Hidalgo (Wilson.
1930 to 1952, has produced beautiful and distinctive vanadinite specimens, as well as a limited number of superb wulfenite specimens.
Attractive specimens of bright red to brown vanadinite from the Apex mine began appearing on the specimen market in the 1950s, and a few very fine red-orange wulfenite specimens were collected there in the early 1970s.
The mine has produced North America's best vanadinite specimens and is also well known for some of Arizona's largest and finest yellow wulfenite crystals.