vanload

van·load

 (văn′lōd′)
n.
The quantity, as of passengers or goods, that a van can carry.

vanload

(ˈvænləʊd)
n
the contents (things or people) of a vanin very large quantities
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References in periodicals archive ?
A beauty spot popular with dog walkers isn't quite so attractive now after a vanload of household rubbish was fly-tipped there.
The Advertiser told last month how Petersburn man James Bergin had taken a vanload of assorted rubbish he had cleared from the North Calder heritage trail - ranging from plastic bottles to guttering and a lawnmower - to the Scottish Parliament in a bid to highlight the issue.
Tipping incidents in Liverpool most commonly involved volumes of waste that were the equivalent of a small vanload. However, the area is also seeing increasing numbers of large-scale tips.
Bearded Broz was founded after the Grenfell Tower fire in London on June 14 last year, assembling a team within eight hours of the tragedy and arriving at the scene with a vanload of supplies.
"They said 'OK, we'll take your offer up, when can you deliver?' So we went to the local cash-and-carry with a pick-up truck and a vanload, and drove with our vehicles full of water," he said.
A van of supplies came in over the weekend from the Siksika First Nation and on Tuesday, Maskwacis brought in a vanload of donations as well.
SO another global financial crash is looming, and I suspect even now a vanload of coppers are pulling up at Gordon Brown's house and bundling him into the back.
A vanload of vital supplies gathered by Scottish Muslims was delivered to a migrant camp in northern France yesterday.
A super spacious luggage area allows you to pack in 512 litres of luggage with the rear seatbacks in place and a vanload with them lowered.
After introducing the importance of science for contemporary American Jews by recounting his experience visiting Kentucky's Creation Museum with a vanload of rabbinical students and providing a brief introduction to the problem of Jews' "ridiculously disproportionate" contributions to twentieth-century science, Efron spends each of the book's three main chapters describing their experience in each "destination."
Postie McDonald had to race around with a vanload of Christmas parcels before kick-off.
"By about the fourth vanload of things to Goodwill, I became very self-reflective," Becker says.