variationist

variationist

(ˌvɛərɪˈeɪʃənɪst) linguistics
n
a person who studies variations in the use of a language by its speakers
adj
(Linguistics) of or relating to variation in usage by speakers of the same language
References in periodicals archive ?
Davydova presents a variationist account of quotative marking in English speaking communities that emerged through colonization and inter-ethnic linguistic practices on the one hand, and on the other hand in the classroom environment and learners' stay-abroad experiences.
This type of analysis has been used in studies within the variationist sociolinguistic framework (Diaz-Campos, 2003, 2004; Labov, 1972a; 1972b, among others).
A variationist account of voice onset time (VOT) among bilingual West Indians in Panama.
The works based on the Variationist Sociolinguistics were structured by the concept of speech community proposed by Labov (2008 [1972], p.150), for whom "speech community is not defined by any marked agreement in the use of linguistic elements, so much as by participation in a set of shared norms" (LABOV, 2008 [1972], p.150).
With this groundwork laid, the authors offer in the heart of their book in chapters 4-9 their analysis of the language of the Hebrew Bible through two methods of historical linguistic investigation: Cross-Textual Variable Analysis (CTVA, chapters 4-6) and Variationist Analysis (VA, chapters 7-9).
"Fronting and Irony in Spanish." In Left Sentence-Peripheries in Spanish: Diachronic, Variationist and Typological Perspectives, edited by Andreas Dufter and Octavio de Toledo, 309-342.
Examining the Greek Aganaktismenoi (indignants) movement, she proposes a functional variationist model.
The six articles included in this special issue of Caribbean Studies vary in terms of their disciplinary perspectives (e.g., sociolinguistics, variationist linguistics, bilingualism, and creolistics) and the specific language contact situations and phenomena under examination, which include bilingualism, code-switching, language contact, multiethnolects, and Creole languages.
Such language use can be captured by means of corpus-based studies, like the present one, which follows a variationist design to investigate proportional preferences in different varieties and registers (see, e.g., Biber et al.