variceal


Also found in: Medical.
Related to variceal: variceal hemorrhage

var·i·ce·al

 (văr′ĭ-sē′əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or caused by a varix or varices: variceal hemorrhage.

variceal

(ˌvɛərɪˈsiːəl)
adj
of or relating to a varix
References in periodicals archive ?
This included serious medical complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (an acute infection in the abdomen that occurs without warning or a clear cause), ascites (an abnormal build-up of fluid in the abdomen that can cause infection) and variceal bleeding (dilated blood vessels in the oesophagus or stomach that can cause internal bleeding).
This article also draws attention to "concerns about using nonselective beta-blocker drugs in patients with cirrhosis." Current data indicate that nonselective beta-blockers reduce all-cause mortality and the risk of first variceal hemorrhage in patients with advanced liver disease (Hepatology.
Gastro esophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 25 to 35% patients having cirrhosis6.
N-Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection in acute gastric variceal bleeding: A prospective follow-up study.
Portal hypertension-related esophageal variceal bleeding, ascites, and hepatic encephalopathy generally determine the prognosis of patients with cirrhosis.
It is used for tretaing acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis after sclerotherapy [1].
An intrahepatic Portal Vein Aneurysm Presenting with Esophageal Variceal Bleeding in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Clinical Entity.
Presencia de hemorragia de tubo digestivo alto (variceal y no variceal), encefalopatia y grados segun la escala de West Haven fueron consideradas como variables intervinientes.
However, compared to other procedures such as foam fillers, vein stripping costs, and blast with electricity, endscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is a costlier treatment alternative.
Duodenal variceal bleeding is a rare complication of portal hypertension; although it only occurs in 0.4% of cases, it is often catastrophic because of the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment (1).
Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) occurs in 25 to 30% of patients with cirrhosis [12].
Mortality from these peristomal variceal bleeds is estimated to be 3-4% per episode; thus many of these patients undergo rapid intervention aimed at either embolization, portal venous decompression, or a combination of the two [1 ].